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COVER 

WHIPPLE HOUSE POND PROJECT, South Main Street (Ipswich Today) 
This pond was constructed for the Bicentennial Celebration in 1976. The 
pond also serves as a Recreational Facility for ice skating. 



Ipswich Public Library 

Ipswich, Massachusetts 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 




1974 ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees 2 



Annual Town Meeting 

Board of Selectmen 

Town Manager 

Vital Statistics 

Youth Commission 

Assessor's Office 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

Town Counsel 

Treasurer-Collector 

Historical Commission 

Police Department 

Civil Defense 

Auxiliary Police 

Fire Department 

Shellfish Constable 

Harbor Master 

Shellfish Advisory Commission 

Board of Health 

Veteran's Services 

Electric Light Department 

Recreation - Park Department 

Library 



5 

33 
34 
35 
38 
38 
39 
39 
40 
40 
41 
42 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
46 
47 
48 
50 
51 



Housing Authority 54 

Essex County Mosquito Control Project 55 

Government Study Committee 56 

MBTA Advisory Committee 57 

Dog Officer 57 

Conservation Commission 58 

Cemetery Department 58 

Department of Public Works 59 

Building Inspector 62 

School Committee 64 

Enrollment Statistics 64 

Superintendent of Schools 65 

High School 68 
Ralph C. Whipple Memorial Jr. High School 68 

Paul F. Doyon Memorial School 69 

Winthrop and Baptist Schools 70 

Burley, Shatswell and Boone Hall Schools 71 

Director of Curriculum 72 

Pupil Personnel Services 73 

School Building Needs Committee 74 

Ipswich High School Graduates for 1974 75 

General Information 77 

Ipswich at a Glance 78 



ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AND COMMITTEES 



ELECTED 



TOWN MODERATOR 

Harold E. Shiveley 



1975 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Joseph A. Navarro, Chairman 
Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 
Edward Kozeneski 
JohnM. Pickard 
Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 



1975 
1977 
1975 
1976 
1977 



CONSTABLE 

Bernie Spencer 



1975 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Paul Gahm, Chairman 1975 

Marie L. Scudder 1975 

James Collins 1975 

Patricia Manning 1977 

Walter Pojasek 1976 
Peter R. Greer (resigned 11-11-74) 1976 
Graham Reedy ( to fill the 

unexpired term) 1976 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Arthur B. Weagle, Chairman 1976 

John G. Thatcher, Jr. 1978 

Stanley E. Eustace 1975 

Harold Bowen 1979 
Alexander Bernhard (State Member) 

resigned April, 1974 ) 1976 

LorettaDeitchUofillthe 

unexpired term) 1976 
JaneBokron, Director 



APPOINTED 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Elected At Town Meeting 

Charles C. Dalton, Chairman 1977 

Edward L. Nagus 1976 

Roger A. Burke (resigned 11-11-74) 1975 

Appointed By Moderator 

Mary P. Conley 1977 

T. Lincoln Morison, Jr. 1975 

Robert E.Waite 1976 

Appointed By Selectmen 

George Tsoutsouras 1975 

Thomas Emery 1976 

James D. Smyth 1977 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Barbara J. Rousseau 

JohnR. Logan 

John Kobos 

Harold G. Comeau, Clerk 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Varnum S. Pedrick 
William R. Lewis 
JohnD. Heaphy 

SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Richard Sheppard 



1976 
1975 
1977 
1977 



1975 
1976 
1977 



1977 



TOWN MANAGER 

Leonard J. Silvia 

TOWN TREASURER 

George C. Mourikas 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Robert H. Leet 

TOWN CLERK 

Harold G. Comeau 



1976 



1977 



1976 



1975 



SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 

Thomas Dorman, Chairman 1975 

Andrew Gianakakis 1975 

Edward Paquin 1975 

Joseph Kmiec 1975 

Joseph Lauderowicz 1975 

James Carter 1975 

Phillip Kent 1975 

James M. Johnson 1975 
Charles R.Terrell 

(resigned 8-27-74) 1975 
Richard Sheppard, Pro tern 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

William C. Wigglesworth, M.D., 

Chair. 1975 

Edward B. Marsh, M.D. 1976 

PaulJ.Valcour 1977 

Edwin Bronk, Agent 1975 

CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Leon B. Turner, Chairman 1976 

Gordon C. Player 1977 

Nicholas A. Markos 1975 
Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Supt. 

TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

MarkJ.Apsey 1975 

Peter Owsiak 1976 

JohnT. Beagen 1977 



TOWN COUNSEL 

F. Dale Vincent, Jr. 



1975 



PLANNING BOARD 

George A. Nikas, Chairman 1975 

JasonA.Sokolov 1978 

JohnP.Prosser 1975 

George Rene Mathey 1976 

Curtis R. Tuttle ( resigned 6-27-74) 1977 
George H. W. Hayes II ( to fill 

the unexpired term) 1977 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Hollie A. Bucklin, Chairman 1976 

William J. Murphy, Vice Chair. 1979 

James Theodosopoulos 1977 

Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 1975 

Harold Perley 1978 

Sharon Josephson, Alternate 1975 

Michael S . Pascucelli, Alternate 1975 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Frederic Winthrop, Jr., Chairman 1977 

William C. Hickling 1975 

Costos Tsoutsouris 1976 

Sarah L. Weatherall 1976 

Dr. Robert L. Goodale 1977 

William E. George 1975 

DavidS. Crestin 1975 

RECREATION & PARKS 
COMMITTEE 

Charles J. Foley, Chairman 1 977 

Elizabeth J. Geanakakis 1975 

Eleanor Knowles 1977 

Frederick J . Jenkins 1976 

Douglas P. Holland 1975 

James H. Daly, Director 1975 



ECONOMIC & INDUSTRIAL 
DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Louis Joslyn, Chairman 1977 

Peter W. Williamson 1979 

PaulBeswick 1977 

Dale E. Dudgeon 1977 

William R. Smith 1978 

George W. Pacheco 1979 

Joseph Hart 1979 
Terrence R. McSweeney 

(resigned 10-23-74) 1975 
Laurien A. Levesque, Jr. 

(resigned 12-09-74) 1976 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John F. Conley, Chairman 1976 

Barbara C. Emberly 1975 

Louise B. Hodgkins 1975 

George R. Mathey 1975 

Lovell Thompson 1976 

John H.Updike 1977 

Alice Keenan 1976 

GOVERNMENT STUDY COM- 
MITTEE 

Irving Small, Chairman 1975 

Jacob Israelsohn 1975 

William H. Smith 1975 

JohnEby 1975 

Gordon Burlingham 1975 

Alfred D. Constantini 1975 

Jessie Girard 1975 

Mary ruth Williamson 1975 
Peter Zervas (deceased) 
John J. Griffin ( to fill the 

unexpired term) 1975 

MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMISSION 

Alice Keenan, Chairman 1975 

Cynthia A. Burns 1975 

Harold Balch 1975 

Herbert Brack 1975 

V.Byron Bennett 1975 

Lawrence E.Cummings 1975 

JohnE. Oxner 1975 

ELECTRIC ADVISORY BOARD 

John H. Ward, Chairman 1975 

Carter B. Hart, Sr. 1975 

Alexander A. Sweenie, Jr. 1975 

George H. Bouchard 1975 

Lawrence R. Sweetser 1975 

George E . Taylor 1975 

Thomas A. Ercoline, Jr. 1975 

Alan Whitehead 1975 

John A. Pechilis 1975 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Ralph Hebert 



1975 



MBTA ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

John C. Vincent, Jr., Chairman 1975 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS 
& MEASURES 

Ralph M. O'Brien 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



Harold F.Balch 


1975 


A.N.D. Hyde 


Bruce R. Ball 


1975 




Raymonds. Barrows 


1975 


ALTERNATE PLUMBING 


Leland Carter 


1975 


INSPECTOR 


Charles K.Cobb, Jr. 


1975 


Rene Rathe 


Cornelius Cleary 


1975 




James C. McManaway 


1975 


WIRING INSPECTOR 


Robert K.Weatherall 


1975 


Alfred Tobiasz 


Mrs. Doris Greenlaw 


1975 


* 


Alan Sherr 


1975 


GAS INSPECTOR 


Donald Whiston 


1975 


Glenfred A. Wanzer 


Margaret D. Ferrini 


1975 


BELL RINGER 


SCHOOL BUILDING 


NEEDS 


Harold Bowen 



COMMITTEE 

William M. Craft, Chairman 
Joseph McGee 
Patricia Manning 
Thomas B.Emery 
Alfred J. Kotek 
Gordon Player, Jr. 
Deanna Cross 

CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 

John R. Harrigan 



1975 



YOUTH COMMISSION 

Cathleen McGinley, Director 
Brother Robert Russell, Chairman 1976 
Janet Chapman 1975 

Robert Wicks trom 1976 

Thomas Gregory III 1976 

Ann Horsman 1976 

Christopher Regan 1977 

Deborah Hovey ( resigned 
Matthew Richards ( to fill the 
unexpired term) 1975 



INSECT PEST CONTROL 
SUPERINTENDENT 

Armand Michaud 



1975 



1975 



1975 



1975 



DOG OFFICER 

Irene Finnegan ( resigned 10-21-74) 1975 
Maura P. Quinn ( to fill the 
unexpired term) 1975 



HARBOR MASTER 

Pete George 

TREE WARDEN 

Armand Michaud 



1975 



1975 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL MARCH 4, 1974 



ESSEX, SS 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County. 

GREETINGS: 

in the Name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 
notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich qualified to vote in town affairs to 
meet at the Ipswich High School in said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE FOURTH DAY OF MARCH, 1974 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening to act on the following articles viz: 

Moderator Harold Shively called the meeting to order at 7: 30 p.m., announcing 
that 844 people were present and the quorum needed was 321. A final count showed 
888 voters in attendance. 

The following tellers were appointed by the Moderator: Mary Williamson, 
John Griffin, Kathy Moore, Philip Ross, Ethel Rogers, Rainer Broekel, James 
Price, Jr., William Murphy, and James Geanakakis. 

The Salute to the Flag was led by Superintendent of Schools John Stella. 

Town Clerk Comeau read the opening and closing paragraphs of the Warrant 
and the Constable's Return. 

Selectmen Chairman Joseph Navarro moved that visitors and students be 
allowed to take seats along the front wall. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 



Article 1. : To fix the salary and compensation of all elected town officers. 

Moved by Edward Kozeneski that the salary and compensation of all 
elected officers be fixed as in the fiscal 1974-1975 budget. Seconded. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Article 2. : To choose the following officers, viz: — 

Moderator for one (1) Year 

Two (2) Selectmen for three (3) years 

Constable for (1) year 

Two Members of the School Committee for three (3) years 

One (1) Member of the Housing Authority for five (5) years 
The above article to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling places as 
follows: 
Precinct 1 Ipswich Junior High School, Green Street 
Precinct 2 Winthrop School, Central Street 
Precinct 3 Ipswich High School, High Street 
Precinct 4 Burley School, Mount Pleasant Avenue 
on Monday, March 11, 1974. The polls shall open at 10 a.m. and close at 8 p.m. 

No action required. 

Article 3. : To choose one member of the Finance Committee to serve for three (3) 
years. 



Moved by Mr. Navarro that Charles Dalton be nominated to the Finance 
Committee to serve for three years. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 4. : To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee, and raise 
and appropriate and transfer money for the ensuing year, including the com- 
pensation of elected town officers. 

Moved by Mr. Dalton that the sum of $6,325,283.00 be raised and ap- 
propriated for the purposes hereinafter designated in the following budgets of the 
Finance Committee report: 

I. Operating Budget, including categories 1 through 44, inclusive; and 

II. Library Budget, including category 45. 

1. For the Operating Budget - A) $2,389,976.00 

of this: 

$60,000.00 from Overlay Surplus to the Reserve Fund; 
60,000.00 from Sewer Receipts Reserve; 
1,429.49 from County Dog Refund; 
3,370.00 from Water Pollution Control Fund; 
140,000.00 from Surplus Revenue 

Available funds are $264,799.49, leaving $2,050,176.51 to be raised and assessed. 

B) For the Highway Division Budget $223,907.00 

of this: 

$70,000.00 from the Local Transportation Aid Program; 
50,844.00 from Highway Aid. 




RIVER WALKWAY, Off County and Green Streets (Ipswich Today) 

The River Walkway was constructed for the Bicentennial Celebration in 
1976. The walkway goes along the bank of the Ipswich River from the 
County Street Bridge to the Green Street Bridge. A number of shrubs 
were planted and benches installed along the walkway. 



Available funds are $120,844.00, leaving $103,063.00 to be raised and assessed. 

Also for the Operating Budget, I move that $75,000.00 be appropriated from the 
Revenue Sharing Trust Fund for the following purposes: 

$25,000.00 for Liability Insurance; 
25,000.00 for Sanitation Composite; 
' 25,000.00 for Equipment Maintenance Expense; 
Total: $75,000.00 

2. For the Library Budget $81,425.00 
of this: 

$ 4,031.25 from Library Aid Reserve, leaving 
77,393.75 to be raised and assessed. 

3. For the School Budget $3,629,975.00 
to be raised and appropriated as hereinafter designated: 

Administration $ 87,115.00 

Instruction 2,806,058.00 

Other School Services & Athletics 369,590.00 

Operation & Maintenance of Plant 281,327.00 

Fixed Charges 34,299.00 

Acquisition of Fixed Assets 51 ,336.00 

Program with other Districts 250.00 
of this: 

$7,500.00 from the Feoffees, leaving $3,622,475.00 to be raised and assessed. 

The total recommended budget is $6,325,283.00 

The total funds available are 397,174.74 

Revenue Sharing Trust Fund appropriation 75,000.00 

The total to be raised and assessed is $5,853,108.26 

Mr. Dalton explained that it had been discovered at the last moment that 
teachers' salaries for July and August cannot be deferred until the next fiscal year 
as planned; therefore the school budget had been increased by $294,000.00. He 
complimented the Assessor and his deputies for keeping the tax rate stable, and 
the Town Treasurer-Collector for doing such a good job in collecting taxes due. He 
announced that David Scudder would not accept reappointment and that he had 
done an outstanding job in his eight years on the Finance Committee. He also felt 
that the form in previous Town Reports for citizens interested in serving on Boards 
and Committees should have been left in. Chairman of the School Committee, Paul 
Gahm, spoke on the deferred salaries, Chapter 766, out-of-town busing to private 
and parochial schools, and state reimbursements. 

The motion carried with 660 voting in the affirmative, 27 in the negative. 



I. OPERATING BUDGET 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



1. MODERATOR 



Expended Expended 
1972 1973 



1973-74 + 



Request Recommend 
1974-75 1974-75 



Salary 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


Expenses 


25 


— 


40 


25 


25 


Total 


125 


100 


140 


125 


125 


2. SELECTMEN: 












Salaries & Wages 


6,390 


6,114 


6,804 


10,722 


6,561 


Expenses 


2,545 


3,004 


3,136 


3,560 


3,560 


Capital Outlay 


— 


533 


67 


— 


— 


Total 


8,935 


9,651 


10,007 


14,282 


10,121 


3. FINANCE COMMITTEE: 












Salaries & Wages 


100 


136 


125 


100 


150 


Expenses 


889 


1,106 


1,044 


1,155 


1,390 


Total 


989 


1,242 


1,169 


1,255 


1,540 


4. PLANNING BOARD: 












Salaries & Wages 


500 


531 


552 


600 


600 


Expenses 


3,716 


3,862 


16,395 


1,800 


1,050 


Planning Consultants: Reimbursable 


— 






10,000 


10,000 


Planning Consultants: General 








6,000 


6,000 


Capital Outlay 


100 


75 


25 


— 


— 


Total 


4,316 


4,468 


16,972 


18,400 


17,650 


5. ELECTIONS & REGISTRATION: 












Salaries & Wages 


10,566 


4,074 


5,761 


11,200 


10,500 


Expenses 


3,800 


2,047 


3,892 


4,100 


3,600 


Total 


14,366 


6,121 


9,653 


15,300 


14,100 


6. APPEALS BOARD: 












Salaries & Wages 


190 


175 


200 


225 


225 


Expenses 


163 


166 


174 


210 


210 


Capital Outlay 


— 


56 


69 






Total 


353 


397 


443 


435 


435 


7. TOWN MANAGER: 












Salaries & Wages 


31,703 


33,842 


34,650 


36,379 


36,379 


Expenses 


13,580 


12,509 


15,125 


15,650 


15,650 


Capital Outlay 


280 


3,336 


39 


180 


100 


Total 


45,563 


49,687 


49,814 


52,209 


52,129 


8. ACCOUNTANT: 












Salaries & Wages 


24,886 


25,843 


26,877 


31,301 


31,301 


Expenses 


6,164 


5,796 


8,483 


6,830 


6,750 


Capital Outlay 


244 


— 


— 


12,550 


12,550 


Total 


31,294 


31,639 


35,360 


50,681 


50,601 


9. TREASURER & COLLECTOR: 












Salaries & Wages 


27,763 


29,909 


31,062 


35,068 


34,468 


Expenses 


3,633 


2,847 


3,893 


5,000 


4,302 


Capital Outlay 


250 


828 


422 


900 


700 


Total 


31,646 


33,584 


34,377 


40,968 


39,470 


10. ASSESSORS: 












Salaries & Wages 


22,692 


23,253 


26,228 


27,377 


26,777 


Expenses 


2,831 


2,411 


3,793 


4,019 


3,715 


Capital Outlay 


— 


636 


49 


500 


500 


Total 


25,523 


26,300 


30,130 


31,896 


30,992 


11. TOWN CLERK: 












Salaries & Wages 


11,515 


12,568 


12,303 


15,483 


12,721 


Expenses 


844 


778 


1,089 


1,365 


1,295 


Capital Outlay 


— 


— 


325 


850 


775 


Total 


12,359 


13,346 


13,717 


17,698 


14,791 



12. LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 

Town Counsel - Court 
Other Counsel 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

13. INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION: 



14. 



15. 



Expended Expended 
1972 1973 



10,901 



6,238 

2,550 

— 595 

177 140 



11,078 



9,523 



1973-74-1- 

5,982 

2,150 

4,376 

555 

13,063 



Request Recommend 
1974-75 1974-75 



6,889 

4,000 

1,000 

330 

12,219 



6,889 

2,500 

2,500 

280 

12,169 



Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


75 
53 

128 


50 

8 

125 

183 


100 
1,067 

1,167 


100 
150 

250 


100 
150 

250 


HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 
Expenses 


77 


21 


440 


200 


200 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Total 


391 

434 

575 

1,400 


498 

542 

3,191 

4,231 


469 
937 

1,809 
3,215 


840 

1,080 

11,200 

13,120 


650 

905 

7,100 

8,655 



16. HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 
Expenses 

17. YOUTH COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

18. BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE: 
Salary 

Expenses 
Total 

19. BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE: 
Salary 

Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



340 



150 



150 



1,375 


8,451 


12,798 


12,136 


10,450 


4,319 


7,464 


10,782 


10,150 


9,350 


1,297 


— 


— 


1,055 


660 


6,991 


15,915 


23,580 


23,341 


20,460 


_ 


_ 





750 


600 


— 


— 


— 


16,050 


11,400 


— 


— 


— 


16,800 


12,000 


— 


— 


— 


540 

625 

1,165 


500 

500 

1,000 



195,143 206,408 244,587 310,494 



286,838 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



20. POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Salaries & Wages 
Chief 
Base 
Incentive 
Holiday 
Total 
Lieutenant 
Sergeants (3) 
Base 
Incentive 
Holiday 
Total 

Patrolmen (13) (14) 

Base 

Incentive 

Holiday 
Total 
Patrolmen - New (1) 

Base 

Holiday 

Total 



13,961 


17,536 


16,561 


18,851 


18,815 


1,466 


2,597 


2,597 


2,808 


1,404 


491 


730 


757 


793 


793 


15,918 


20,863 


19,915 


22,416 


21,012 


— 


— 


— 


14,000 


— 


30,704 


32,134 


30,508 


34,902 


34,902 


1,509 


2,571 


1,571 


1,736 


868 


1,300 


1,353 


1,403 


1,471 


1,471 


33,513 


35,058 


33,482 


38,109 


37,241 


117,884 


122,969 (13] 


118,302 (14) 


143,854 


143,854 


5,881 


7,064 


7,064 


13,648 


6,824 


4,712 


5,113 


4,405 


6,029 


6,029 


128,477 


135,146 


129,771 


163,531 


156,707 


— 


3,501 


8,252 


9,369 


9,369 


— 


165 


275 


395 


395 


— 


3,666 


8,527 


9,764 


9,764 



Expended Expended 
1972 1973 



Overtime 
Shift Differential 
Court Fees 
Other Salaries 

Total Salaries 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

21. FIRE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 

Chief 

Base 

Incentive 

Hoi iday 
Total 
Captains (3) 

Base 

Holiday 
Total 
Firefighters (12) 

Base 

Incentive 

Holiday 
Total 
Firefighters New (2 ■ July ) 

Base 

Holiday 

Total 

Overtime 

Call Lieutenants (5) 
Call Operator (1) 
Call Men (26) 
Other Salaries 

Total Salaries 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

22. CIVIL DEFENSE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

23. SHELLFISH: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

24. HARBORS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Tot a 

25. BUILDING INSPECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 



11,472 

2,188 

5,997 

3,274 

200,839 

11,156 

9,267 

221,262 



18,313 

2,112 

6,223 

3,386 

224,767 

10,146 

9.890 

244.803 



1973-74 + 

13,048 

2,030 

5,673 

3,344 

215,790 

11,164 

1,498 

228,452 



Request Recommend 
1974-75 1974-75 



12,000 

2,300 

7,000 

5,485 

274,605 

13,550 

9,925 

298,080 



14,870 



11,332 



20,840 



10,000 

2,300 

6,500 

5,435 

248,959 

13,235 

8,825 

271,019 



13,961 


17,114 


17,461 


17,830 


17,830 


— 


400 


400 


400 


400 


491 


722 


727 


752 


752 


14,452 


18,236 


18,588 


18,982 


18,982 


30,256 


31,176 


31,034 


33,015 


33,015 


1,300 


1,275 


1,307 


1,392 


1,392 


31,556 


32,451 


32,341 


34,407 


34,407 


108,797 (12 


) 108,734 (14) 114,407 


132,620 


132,620 


— 




400 


400 


— 


4,313 


4,628 


4,707 


5,590 


5,590 


113,110 


113,362 


119,513 


138,610 


138,210 


— 


10,511 


17,048 


— 




— 


457 


721 


— 




— 


10,968 


17,769 


— 




7,496 


8,110 


5,334 


10,000 


7,000 


1,400 


2,100 


2,100 


2,100 


2,100 


600 


700 


700 


700 


700 


12,328 


13,900 


16,500 


15,600 


15,600 


953 


— 


— 


200 


— 


181,895 


199,827 


212,845 


220,599 


216,999 


11,133 


8,244 


11,204 


11,700 


10,200 


1,995 


6,316 


4,459 


3,345 


3,195 


194,983 


214,387 


228,508 


235,644 


230,394 


1,000 


1,381 


1,390 


1,725 


1,725 


1,009 


926 


1,103 


1,000 


1,070 


1,188 


820 


655 


750 


750 


3,197 


3,127 


3,148 


3,475 


3,545 


9,387 


9,894 


10,229 


10,500 


10,500 


5,483 


1,438 


10,611 


7,500 


7,150 



400 400 

18,400 18,050 



— 


2,000 


2,333 


2,000 


2,000 


— 


998 


1,175 


1,120 


1,070 


— 


— 


— 


685 


995 


— 


2,998 


3,508 


3,805 


4,065 


4,287 


4,603 


10,167 


10,000 


11,580 


591 


1,112 


1,040 


1,165 


1,065 


— 


75 


25 


— 


— 


4,878 


5,790 


11,232 


11,165 


12,645 


439,190 


482,437 


495,688 


570,569 


539,718 



10 



HEALTH & SANITATION 

Expended Expended , Q „ ... Request Recommend 
1972 1973 1*73-74+ 1974-75 1974-75 



26. 


HEALTH AGENT: 














Salaries & Wages 


14,530 


14,636 


15,907 


14,750 


16,431 




Expenses 


9,201 


10,368 


11,806 


10,950 


10,025 




Capital Outlay 


— 


756 


767 


— 






Total 


23,731 


25,760 


28,480 


25,700 


26,456 


27. 


OUTSIDE CONTRACTS: 














Garbage Collection 


27,000 


24,813 


30,750 


18,500 


— 




Rubbish Collection 


52,000 


49,208 


58,333 


47,000 


— 




Dump Maintenance 


34,150 


30,741 


43,617. 


26,500 


— 




Sanitation Composite Contract 


— 


— 


— 


— 


92,000 




Recycling Collection 


— 


— 


— 


1,000 


1,000 




Spring & Fall Cleaning 


— 


— 


— 


1,300 


1,300 




Total 


113,150 


104,762 


132,700 


94,300 


94,300 



TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 



136,881 



130,522 



161,180 120,000 120,756 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



28. 



VETERANS' BENEFITS 












Salaries & wages 


— 










Expenses 


118,452 


105,992 


160,373 


185,000 


172,000 


Total 


118,452 


105,992 


160,873 


185,000 


172,000 



PUBLIC WORKS 



29. ADMINISTRATION 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Total 

30. BUILDING DIVISION 

a) Town Hall 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

b) Memorial Building 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

c) Sewer Buildings 
Expense 

d) Fire Building 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

e) Town Garage 
Expense 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

f) Cemetery Buildings 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

g) Park Buildings 
Expenses 
Peat 

Capital Outlay 
Total 
h) Library Buildings 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

Total 



11,924 

1,470 

13,394 


12,530 

1,889 

14,419 


12,811 

2,826 

15,637 


12,949 

3,390 

16,339 


12,949 

2,490 

15,439 


6,531 

6,041 

6,818 

19,390 


6,890 
6,309 

13,199 


7,069 

6,394 

5,000 

18,463 


7,475 
8,800 

16,275 


7,475 
8,800 

16,275 


2,566 
2,566 


1,324 
1,324 


2,927 
2,927 


4,175 

300 

4,475 


3,525 
3,525 


479 


478 


523 


725 


725 


2,120 

400 

2,520 


2,506 
15,886 
18,392 


5,516 
17,386 
22,902 


4,525 
4,525 


4,225 
4,225 


2,190 
2,190 


2,117 

750 

2,867 


2,881 
2,881 


3,485 
3,485 


3,485 
3,485 


260 
260 


284 
369 
653 


578 
370 
948 


565 
16,000 
16,565 


565 
4,000 
4,565 


657 
2,365 


886 
2,255 


1,307 
2,528 


2,100 


— 


3,022 


3,141 


3,835 


2,100 


— 


1,963 
1,660 
3,623 


2,218 

390 

2,518 


2,626 

600 

3,226 


3,680 
3,680 


3,680 
3,680 


34,050 


42,572 


58,233 


51,830 


36,480 



11 



Expended Expended 
1972 1973 



31. HIGHWAY DIVISION 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

32. EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

33. SNOW & ICE CONTROL 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Rental 
Total 

34. FORESTRY 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

35. SEWER 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 

36 RECREATION & PARKS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

37. CEMETERIES 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

38. INSURANCE 
Motor Vehicle 
Workmen's Compensation 
Package Insurance 
Public Official Bonds 
Fire& Police 

Total 

39. BENEFITS 

Military Service Credits 
County Retirement System 
Health & Life 
Total 

40. DEBT SERVICE 
Payment of Interest 
Paymentof Principal 
Total 



67,916 

90,417 

18,149 

176,482 

16,100 

36,498 

763 

53,361 



18,026 
20,616 
14,418 
53,060 



34,122 

14,214 

600 

49,936 



17,517 

8,423 

25,940 



72,751 
107,363 

11,040 
191,154 

17,395 

33,599 

900 

51,895 



3,658 
10,621 

1,308 
15,587 



37,941 

13,065 

6,720 

57,726 



18,630 

9,348 

27,978 



1973-74 + 

76,853 
117,404 

27,500 
221,757 

18,247 

40,437 

500 

59,184 



24,813 
23,733 
16,692 
65,278 



Request Recommend 
1974-75 1974-75 



406,223 401,331 



39,193 
10,557 
18,405 
68,155 



18,726 
10,847 
29,573 

517,817 



81,397 
124,510 

29,400 
235,307 

19,438 
44,005 

63,443 



15,000 
20,900 
10,000 
45,900 



44,372 

14,175 

8,450 

66,997 



20,329 
15,783 
36,112 



80,897 
118,610 

24,400 
223,907 

19,438 
45,005 

64,443 



15,000 
20,900 
10,000 
45,900 



41,872 

12,795 

8,450 

64,117 



20,104 
14,485 
34,589 



515,928 484,875 



46,444 


53,680 


54,374 


62,964 


59,446 


14,364 


13,983 


12,542 


17,845 


15,745 


4,337 


6,385 


7,775 


15,050 


8,800 


65,145 


74,048 


74,691 


95,859 


83,991 


39,102 


47,145 


52,497 


52,685 


51,235 


9,545 


6,l0l 


9,269 


9,619 


7,527 


4,920 


975 


3,025 


8,690 


4,090 


53,567 


54,221 


64,791 


70,994 
7,000 


62,852 
7,000 


26,398 


17,743 


23,139 


30,000 


30,000 


36,441 


35,647 


22,659 


30,000 


30,000 


616 


565 


870 


700 


700 


— 


— 


3,000 


— 




63,455 


53,955 


49,668 


67,700 


67,700 


8,348 


9,306 


10,694 


10,000 


10,000 


166,719 


242,195 


242,195 


250,000 


250,000 


45,740 


63,351 


74,492 


65,000 


65,000 


220,807 


314,852 


327,381 


325,000 


325,000 


49,819 


59,271 


72,915 


64,153. 


64,153 


338,000 


294,000 


289,000 


331,000 


331,000 


387,819 


353,271 


361,915 


395,153 


395,153 



UNCLASSIFIED 



41. ENCUMBRANCES 6,862 


26,348 


23,428 


— 


— 


42. RESERVE FUND — 


16,714 


66,869 


— 


60,000 


43. BOND ISSUE COSTS 2,445 


— 


5,000 


2,500 


2,500 


44. INTEREST ON TAX ANTICIPATION 25,056 


31,523 


8,805 


12,500 


12,500 


Total 34,363 


74,585 


104,102 


15,000 


75,000 


TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 2,121,315 


2,251,622 


2,562,693 


2,671,697 


2,613,883 



12 



45. 



46. 





II. 


LIBRARY 












Expended 
1972 


Expended . , ... Requesl 
1973 »*/*-«-r 1974-75 


Recommend 
1974-75 


LIBRARY 














Salaries & Wages 




45,164 


47,357 


53,426 


57,825 


57,825 


Expenses 




14,489 


18,557 


16,740 


22,150 


22,100 


Capital Outlay 




— 


803 


1,700 


1,500 


1,500 


Total 




59,653 


66,717 


71,866 


81,475 


81,425 




Ill 


. SCHOOL 








SCHOOL 














Administration 




70,882 


67,385 


86,642 


87,115 


87,115 


Instruction 




2,017,300 


2,189,089 


2,140,740 


2,512,058 


2,806,058 


Other School Services & Athletics 


311,440 


334,633 


346,074 


369,590 


369,590 


Oper. & Maint. of Plant 


251,154 


247,435 


243,174 


281,327 


281,327 


Fixed Charges 




36,632 


12,751 


37,109 


34,299 


34,299 


Acquisition of Fixed Assets 


32,206 


33,376 


43,285 


51,336 


51,336 


Programs with Other 


Districts 


5,686 


4,201 


1,202 


250 


250 


Emcumbrances from 


Other Years 


50,409 


.13,031 


6,414 


— 




Total 




2,775,709 


2,901,901 


2,904,640 


3,335,975 


3,629,975 


AL OF BUDGETS 1, 


II & III 


4,956,677 


5,220,240 


5,539,199 


6,089,147 


6,325,283 



EXPENDITURE BY ARTICLE: 

Whittier Vocational 60,725 308,543 313,846 291,289 291,289 

+ NOTE: July 1, 1973 - June 30, 1974 figures include actual expenditures for the period July 1, 
1973 to December 31, 1973 and the Balance Remaining (unused appropriation) for the period 
January 1, 1974 to June 30, 1974. 

Article 5. : To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue for the financial years beginning July 1, 1974 and June 30, 1975 in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance 
with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Moved by Charles K. Cobb, Jr. that the Town Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from time to 
time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1974 in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue 
a note or notes therefore, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. Seconded. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

Article 6. : To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
current expense of the Water Department, the same to be paid from revenues by 
the Water Department during the fiscal year 1975, and to see what action the Town 
will take in regard to surplus funds. 

Moved by Paul Gillespie that the Town raise and appropriate a sum of 
$215,995.00 for the current expenses and a sum of $58,100.00 for the Plant and In- 
vestment Account of the Water Department for the fiscal year July 1, 1974 - June 
30, 1975. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. Motion carried. 

Article 7. : To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum to be made available 
for said purpose from the Chamber of Commerce. 



13 



Moved by Mr. Navarro that $700.00 be appropriated to be used in con- 
junction with a matching sum of the Chamber of Commerce of Ipswich for the 
purpose of the promotion of the Town of Ipswich. Seconded. The motion carried 
with 584 voting in the affirmative, 76 in the negative. Fred Paulitz asked why a 
hand count was taken on an unimportant article; the Moderator replied that he 
didn' t want any court cases or questions. 

Article 8. : To see what action the Town will take to the transfer of any surplus 
funds in the Electric Light Department 

Mr. Navarro moved that this article be indefinitely postponed, as it is 
not known what the surplus will be; the article will be brought up at a special town 
meeting. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. Motion carried. 

Article 9. : To see what sum the Town will raise and appropriate to pay unpaid 
bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid. 

Mr. Kozeneski moved that the sum of $205.85 be appropriated to pay 
unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid, as follows: 

School Department - E. R. Moore Company - $203.90 

Fire Department - Massachusetts Correctional Institute - $ 1 .95 

Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. Motion 
carried. 

Article 10. : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for construction of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Moved by Mr. Gillespie that the sum of $39,000.00 be raised and ap- 
propriated for the construction of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 
Seconded. Mr. Gillespie explained that these funds would be used to straighten and 
widen Linebrook Road. Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried by 
unanimous voice vote. 

Article 11. : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the Maintenance of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Moved by John Pickard that the sum of $4,500.00 be raised and ap- 
propriated for the maintenance of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 
Seconded. Finance C6mmittee recommended. Motion carried on unanimous voice 
vote. 

Article 12. : To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money to cover 
the Town's share of the annual operating, and debt service expenses of the Whittier 
Regional Vocational Technical High School District. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$291,289.00 to cover the Town's apportioned share of the annual planning, operating 
and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High 
School District. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended with reservations; 
Edward Nagus explained that the amount was based on a formula based on 
enrollment, and that we still haven't been reimbursed under Chapter 70. Motion 
carried with 617 voting in the affirmative, 82 in the negative. 



14 



Article 13. : To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum to the Stabilization 
Fund. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice 
vote. 

Article 14. : To hear and act upon the reports of committee, and to continue such 
committees as the Town may vote to continue. 

Moved by John Conley that the report of the Historic District Study 
Committee be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

Moved by William M. Craft that the report of the School Building Needs Committee 
be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by John Vincent, Jr. that the report of the MBTA Study Committee be 
accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by Alice Keenan that the report of the Mosquito Control Committee be 
accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by Irving Small that the report of the Government Study Committee be 
accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 15.: To see if the Town Meeting will adopt an order under Chapter 43B, 
Section 10A, of the General Laws, proposing the following amendment to the Town 
Charter subject to the approval of the Attorney General pursuant to Section IOC, to 
be submitted to the voters in accordance with Chapter 43B, Section 11, at that part 
of the next annual town meeting devoted to balloting in 1975: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Charter (Chapter 620 of the Acts 
of 1966), by deleting therefrom Section 1, "Town Meeting," and substituting 
therefore the following section: 

Section 1. Town Meeting. The annual town meeting of the Town of Ipswich for the 
transaction of all business except the election of such officers and the deter- 
mination of such matters as are by law to be determined by ballot shall be held on 
such date as the town shall provide by By-Law consistent with the provisions of the 
General Laws as amended. That part of the annual town meeting devoted to the 
election of officers and to take action on such matters as are by law to be deter- 
mined by ballot shall be held within thirty days of the annual town meeting, and the 
time and place of holding such election and vote shall be stated in the warrant for 
the annual town meeting. 

Moved by Mr. Cobb that the Town Meeting adopt an order under 
Chapter 43B, Section 10A of the General Laws, proposing the following amendment 
to the Town Charter, subject to the approval of the Attorney General pursuant to 
Section IOC, to be submitted to the voters in accordance with Chapter 43B, Section 
11, at that part of the next annual town meeting devoted to balloting in 1975: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Charter (Chapter 620 of the 
Acts of 1966), by deleting therefrom Section 1 "Town Meeting", and substituting 
therefor the following section: 



15 



SECTION 1. TOWN MEETING. The annual town meeting of the Town of Ips- 
wich for the transaction of all business except the election of such officers and the 
determination of such matters as are by law to be determined by ballot shall be 
held on such date as the town shall provide by By-law consistent with the 
provisions of the General Laws as amended. That part of the annual town meeting 
devoted to the election of officers and to take action on such matters as are by law 
to be determined by ballot shall be held within thirty days of the annual town 
meeting, and the time and place of holding such election and vote shall be stated in 
the warrant for the annual town meeting. 

Seconded. Mr. Cobb explained that this change is recommended due to change 
in fiscal year and will go on the ballot following the 1975 Annual Town Meeting. Mr. 
Desmond suggested that we hold future town meetings on a Saturday and Mr. Cobb 
agreed that this suggestion would be considered. Motion carried on unanimous 
voice vote. 

Article 16. : To see what action the Town will take to amend Chapter XV, Section 4 
of the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich with respect to the operation of 
motorboats on the Ipswich River upstream of the Sylvania Dam. 

Moved by Frederic Winthrop, Jr. that the Town vote to amend the 
General By-laws of the Town of Ipswich pertaining to the operating of motorboats 
as follows: 

1. By amending Chapter XV, Section 4(a) of said By-law by adding, as number 
(5), the following words: 

(5) any part of the Ipswich River upstream of the dam, commonly known as 
the Sylvania Dam. 

2. By amending Chapter XV, Section 4, by substituting the following Section 4(e) 
for the present Section 4 ( e) : 

4(e) It shall be unlawful to operate or cause to be operated any motor boat or 
other vessel propelled by an internal combustion engine of greater than five (5) 
horsepower on any part of the Ipswich River upstream of the dam commonly 
known as the Sylvania Dam. 

and by designating the present Section 4(e) as Section 4(f). 

Seconded. Mr. Winthrop explained that residents have complained of large 
motorboats traveling the river at high speeds, endangering canoeists and swim- 
mers, creating noise and erosion of the riverbanks. Several hearings were held by 
the Conservation Commission and resulted in this amendment restricting motor to 
five horsepower and speed to five miles per hour. Recommended by the Board of 
Selectmen and Finance Committee. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

Article 17.: To see whether or not the Town will accept provisions of Chapter 48, 
Section 36A of the General Laws with respect to the appointment of call and part- 
call firemen to the regular force. 

Moved by Robert Como that the Town accept the provisions of Chapter 
48, Section 36A of the General Laws with respect to the appointment of call and 
part-call firemen to the regular force. Seconded. 



16 



Mr. Como explained that he had worked up from auxiliary to call fireman, and 
now has a provisional appointment. The Civil Service exams have not been given 
for some time and he is now too old to take them; he asks the Town to bypass them. 
Two other men on the force are in the same predicament. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously supported this article. The Finance Committee unanimously opposed 
it, and suggested that Mr. Como seek a special act of the Legislature, as had been 
done recently for a North Andover fireman. Raymond Sullivan spoke in favor of 
the article, Charles Schultz spoke against it. The motion was defeated by 164 voting 
in the affirmative, 504 in the negative. 

Article 18.: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for the 
purchase of a fence, press box and additional seats for the Ipswich High School 
Athletic Field. 

Moved by George Bouzianis that the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $23,550.00 for the purchase of a fence, pressbox and additional seats for the 
Ipswich High School Athletic Field. Seconded. 

A motion was made to allow Athletic Director Elliott Roundy (a non-resident) 
to speak on the motion. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. He explained the need for 
the items. The Board of Selectmen recommended. The Finance Committee op- 
posed the article, feeling it should have been in the school budget. The School 
Committee has refused to recommend this article for three years as a matter of 
basic priorities. The motion was defeated with 342 voting in the affirmative, 407 in 
the negative. 

Dr. Robert Waite asked for reconsideration of the fence item. Seconded. 

Unanimous voice vote. Dr. Waite moved to amend Article 18 to a total of $10,500.00 

for the construction of a fence to surround the High School Athletic Field. Mary 

Williamson declared that by this motion, the meeting was voting on the original 

article plus another fence. Dr. Waite changed his motion to read "I move to amend 

Article 18 to a total of $10,350.00 for the construction of a fence to surround the High 

School Athletic Field, and strike all other such items as appear in the original 

motion." Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. The motion carried on a 

unanimous voice vote. 

i 

Article 19. : To see if the Town will amend the By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, as 
adopted at the Annual Town Meeting on March 5, 1973, by adding the following 
paragraph at the end of Section 1 of Chapter XV thereof: 

(c) No person shall on any street, sidewalk, or public place, without a written 
permit from the Board of Selectmen, consume any alcoholic beverages or possess 
any opened container, full or partially full, of any alcoholic beverage. 

Moved by Mr. Cobb that the Town vote to amend the By-laws of the 
Town of Ipswich, as adopted at the Annual Town Meeting on March 5, 1973 by 
adding the following paragraph at the end of Section 1 of Chapter XV thereof: 

(e) No person shall on any street, sidewalk, or public place, without a written 
permit from the Board of Selectmen, consume any alcoholic beverage or possess 
any opened container, full or partially full, of any alcoholic beverage. 

Seconded. Dr. Waite stated that the Finance Committee had originally been 
against the article but after discussing it with the Selectmen and the Police Chief 
were 6-3 in favor. Mr. Borysthen-Tkacz suggested that a penalty should be added, 
and asked who would enforce this law? Police Chief Brouillette replied that the 
Police Department would be the enforcing agency, and the maximum penalty 



17 



would be a fine of $20.00. Cathleen McGinley for the Youth Commission, which was 
unanimously in favor, urged passage to help stop older teenagers from purchasing 
liquor for younger ones. The motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

Article 20.: To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money for the con- 
struction of a pavilion approximately 40 feet by 100 feet at the site of the former 
Lighthouse Cottage on town property, and to see what method the Town will adopt 
to raise and appropriate such sum by borrowing or otherwise... or take any action 
with respect thereto. 

Moved by Mr. Pickard that this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Seconded. Finance Committee agrees. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 21. : To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to con- 
tract for ambulance service for residents of the Town, and to raise and appropriate 
funds thereto. 

Moved by Town Manager Leonard Silvia that the Town raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $12,000.00 to contract for ambulance service for residents of 
the Town. Seconded. Mr. Silvia explained that it would cost $56,000.00 to buy and 
staff a Town ambulance; that only one bid other than Carlton's had been received, 
and it was much higher. Last year the ambulance service made 600 intown runs, 
100 out-of-town runs. The Finance Committee recommended with one abstention. 
Motion carried with unanimous voice vote. 

Article 22. :.To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter VI of the Town By-Laws 
entitled Treasurer and Collector by adding the following section: "Section 3". 
"The Collector of Taxes shall collect, under the title of Town Collector, all accounts 
due the Town, and may take such legal action as may be necessary to collect the 
same." 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the Town vote to amend Chapter VI of the 
Town By-laws entitled Treasurer and Collector by adding the following section: 
"Section 3. The Collector of Taxes shall collect, under the title of Town Collector, 
all accounts due the Town, and may take such legal action as may be necessary to 
collect the same." Seconded. 

Mr. Navarro explained that this section was eliminated from the amendment to 
the By-laws last year, and would bring about reorganization of the Billing system. 
The Finance Committee recommended 7-1-1, felt that it would make for more 
efficiency, would not necessitate an increase in employees or space. Motion 
carried on voice vote. 

Article 23. : To see if the Town will appropriate funds for the purchase or rental of 
an office computer for use as needed by the Town. 

Moved by Mr. Kozeneski that this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 



Article 24.: To see if the Town will vote to accept the gift of the Ipswich Public 
Library property, real and personal, subject to the terms of decree of Probate 
Court of Essex which authorizes said gift to the Town by the present trustees of 
said library, Essex Probate Court, No. 1029 Eq. 



18 



Moved by Town Counsel Dale Vincent that the Town accept the gift of 
the Ipswich Public Library property, real and personal, subject to the terms of 
decree of Probate Court of Essex which authorizes said gift to the Town by the 
present trustees of said library, Essex Probate Court, No. 1029 Eq. effective July 1, 
1974. Seconded. Recommended by Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee. 
Motion carried on unanimous voice vote. 

Article 25.: To see if the Town will pay to the widow of former Chief, Russell 
Scahill. that compensation due to the Fire Chief under Chapter 1082, Laws of 1971. 

Moved by Mr. Kozeneski that the Town pay to the Estate of former Fire 
Chief Russell Scahill, the sum of $1,832.64 which is compensation due to the former 
Chief under Chapter 1082 of the Acts of 1971 for salary, vacation and holiday 
payments. Seconded. The Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

Article 26.: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
negotiate for the purchase of land located in the northwesterly section of Town and 
owned by the Country Club of Ipswich and Ipswich Fairways Inc. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to negotiate for the purchase of land located in the northwesterly sec- 
tion of Town and owned by the Country Club of Ipswich and Ipswich Fairways Inc. 
Seconded. 

Mr. Navarro explained that we don't even know if the developer would be in- 
terested in selling but it would be worth a try. The Finance Committee was 
unanimously in favor, believing it wise to explore all avenues to resolve problem. 
Robert Bamford spoke against article, claimed Mr. Navarro had been negotiating 
without consent of Board. (Denied by Mr. Navarro.) Frederic Winthrop said that 
the Conservation Commission has studied all reports on PCD, and concluded that 
there is not enough water to supply such a large development and also are con- 
cerned that it is in our watershed. The Planning Board -felt it improper to take a 
stand on the article, since it is engaged in negotiating with the developer. T. Lin- 
coln Morrison stated that the article only calls for the Selectmen to negotiate, not 
commit, and moved the question. Seconded. Motion carried with 427 voting in the 
affirmative, 194 voting in the negative. 

Article 27. : To see what action the Town will take to designate roads in the Town 
as "Scenic Roads" according to Chapter 67 of the Acts of 1973, including but not 
limited to: 

Argilla, Candlewood, Fellows, Heartbreak, Labor-In-Vain, Goodhue, Old 
England, Pineswamp, Sagamore, Chebacco, Waldingfield, Rocky Hill, 
Meetinghouse Green, and Newbury. 

Moved by Mr. Winthrop that the Town designate the following roads as 
"Scenic Roads" in accordance with Chapter 67 of the Acts of 1973: Argilla, Candle- 
wood, Chebacco, Fellows, Goodhue, Heartbreak, Labor-in-Vain, Meetinghouse 
Green, Newbury, Old England, Pineswamp, Rocky Hill, Sagamore, Waldingfield. 
Seconded. This article would not permit the removal or disturbing of trees or walls 
along these roads without permission. The article was approved by the Planning 
Board, Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee. Motion carried by voice vote. 



19 



Article 28.: To see whether the Town will vote to accept the portion of Colonial 
Drive connecting with Topsfield Road, as shown by plan filed with the Town Clerk 
and as laid out, constructed and bounded by markers in conformity with Chapter 
XI, Section 7 of the Town By-Laws. 

Moved by Jason Sokolov that the Town accept as a public way the layout 
of Colonial Drive as shown on a plan entitled "Bayview, Topsfield Road, Ipswich, 
Scale 1" - 40', March 5, 1973, Sheets 1 of 3 and 4 of 5" from Topsfield Road to Station 
5+20 as shown on said plan recorded in the Essex County South District Registry of 
Deeds, Book No. 127, Plan No. 17 and on file with the Town Clerk. Seconded. The 
Finance Committee was 6-2-1 in favor. Raymond Sullivan, representing Ipswich 
Bay Realty Trust, spoke in favor. John Logan, Cornelius Cleary, George Scott 
spoke in opposition. Motion was defeated with 130 voting in the affirmative, 390 in 
the negative. 

Article 29. : To see whether the Town will vote to amend the provisions of the 
Zoning By-Law with respect to signs or to adopt a new sign by-law in accordance 
with the General Laws, Chapter 93, Sections 29-33 inclusive. 

Moved by John Prosser that the Town vote to amend the Protective 
Zoning By-law by the following: 
Section III. Definitions 

Delete Sign 

Delete Sign, Area of 
Section V. 

Delete A.8 

Delete A.9 

Renumber Section V. A. 10 and 11 to 8. and 9. 

Delete in Section V.A.9a (formerly V.A.lla) the words "other than an 
announcement sign of not more than two (2) square feet" 

Delete V.E.12 and renumber V.E.13 to V.E.12 

Delete V.F.8 and renumber V.F.9 and 10 to V.F.8 and 9 

Delete V.G.1,2 and 7, and renumber V.G.3,4,5, and6 toV.G.1,2,3, and 4 
Section VIII.D 

Third Sentence, delete the words "necessary traffic directional signs not 
exceeding two (2) square feet in area" and the fifth sentence 

Renumber Section IX Administration to Section X Administration and insert 
the following: "Section IX Signs" 

Seconded. Planning Board recommended, stated that this is based on a model law. 
Both Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee complained that they had no 
information on this amendment. Mrs. Nathaniel Quint for her husband said that all 
merchants were against it. William Manning stated that the Chamber of Com- 
merce opposed it; in fact, were never asked about it. They feel the present law is 
fine if it is enforced. The question was moved for indefinite postponement. 
Seconded. Motion carried with 268 voting in the affirmative, 132 in the negative. 

At 11:30 p.m., Mr. Navarro moved that the meeting adjourn until the following 
night, Tuesday, March 5, 1974 at 7:30 p.m. at the Ipswich High School. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 



20 



+ + + + ^- 

IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL March 5, 1974 

Moderator Harold Shively called the adjourned Town Meeting to order at 7:35 
p.m., with a quorum of 426 voters present. 

Article 30. : To see what action the Town will take to control the use of its wetlands 
by amending the zoning by-law of the Town to add in Section IV a new district 
entitled "Wetlands District" and to add in Section V a new paragraph specifying 
the permitted uses in said wetlands district. Boundary lines, outlining wetlands 
district are the lines shown on aerial photographs of the Town of Ipswich flown in 
April 1973, and on file with the Town Clerk. 

Moved by Mr. Sokolov that the Protective Zoning By-law of the Town of 
Ipswich 1970, as amended to date, be amended as follows: 

1. By amending Section IV. A of said By-law by deleting the word "twelve" and 
numeral "12" from the first line thereof and in substitution adding the word 
"thirteen" and the numeral "13" so that the first line shall read as follows: 

'The Town of Ipswich is hereby divided into districts of thirteen ( 13) types to be 
known as:' 

2. By amending Section IV of said By-law by adding, as number 13, new districts 
as follows: 

'13. Wetlands Districts. The provisions applicable to the Wetlands Districts 
shall be considered as overlapping other zoning districts. In those areas where a 
Wetlands District overlaps another zoning district, the provisions of the Wetlands 
District shall be controlling.' 

3. By amending Section IV. B of said By-law by changing the first sentence thereof 
to read as follows: 

'The boundaries of each of the said districts, except the Wetlands Districts, are 
hereby established as shown, defined and bounded on the map accompanying this 
By-law and on file with the Clerk of the Town of Ipswich titled "Zoning District 
Map of the Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, dated December 24, 1957, as amended 
to date.' 

4. By amending Section IV. B of said By-law by adding the following sentence, as 
third and fourth sentences, to the first paragraph about subsection 1 : 

'The boundaries of each Wetlands District are hereby established as shown, 
defined and bounded on a set of maps accompanying this By-law, prepared by the 
Autometrics Division of the Raytheon Corporation, Way land, Mass., each entitled 
"Town of Ipswich Natural Resources Map, scale 1" — 600' " and on file with the 
Clerk of the Town of Ipswich. The various Wetlands Districts are identified on said 
maps, as Fresh Marsh, Deep Fresh Marsh, Tidal Flat, Shrub Swamp, Wooded 
Swamp, Salt Marsh, and Pond.' 

5. By amending Section V of said By-law by adding a new paragraph I, as follows: 

"I. WETLANDS DISTRICT 

Within the purposes of Section I, the Wetlands Districts is intended to protect 
the public health and safety, persons and property against the hazards of flood- 
water inundation; to preserve and maintain the ground water table; to protect the 



21 



community from the costs which may be incurred when unsuitable development 
occurs in swamps, marshes, along water courses, or in areas subject to floods; and 
to conserve natural conditions, wildlife, and green spaces for the education, 
recreation, and general welfare of the public." 

The following uses are permitted as a matter of right insofar as not otherwise 
prohibited in the underlying zoning districts: 

1. Conservation of soil, water, plants, and wildlife, including wildlife management 
shelters. 

2. Outdoor recreation including play and sporting areas, nature study, boating, 
fishing and hunting where otherwise legally permitted, footpaths, duck blinds, 
private boathouses and landings, and any other non-commercial recreation use. 

3. Forestry, grazing of livestock, farming, nurseries, truck gardening; and har- 
vesting of crops, fish and shellfish. 

4. Accessory uses, such as flower and vegetable gardens, lawns, fences, flagpoles, 
and non-commercial signs when and as permitted in the underlying district. 

5. Maintenance and repair of existing structures, roadways, and utilities. 

6. Maintenance of the existing town dump. 

Except as provided above, there shall be in the Wetlands District: 

No land fill or dumping. 

No construction of buildings or other structures. 

No dredging or drainage, other than for mosquito or flood control works by an 
authorized public agency. 

No permanent storage of materials or equipment. 

If any land shown on the zoning map as being in the Wetlands District is proven to 
the reasonable satisfaction of the Board of Appeals as being in fact not generally 
wet, the Board of Appeals shall permit the use of such land for whatever the un- 
derlying district allows: In determining whether or not land included within the 
boundaries of the Wetlands District is generally wet, the Board of Appeals shall 
apply the following criteria : 

INLAND WETLANDS 

Ponds — Relatively small shallow bodies of standing water in which relatively 

quiet water and extensive plant occupancy are common characteristics. 

Deep Fresh Marsh — Land of this type is characterized by considerable open 

water interspersed with patches of floating or emergent vegetation. Water depth 

ranges from six inches to three feet through most of the growing season. It is too 

wet to support woody vegetation. 

Fresh Marsh — Land where the soil is usually waterlogged or covered up to six 

inches in depth during the growing season and characterized by emergent 

vegetation such as reeds, rushes and cat-tails. 

There is usually little open water or woody vegetation present. 

Shrub Swamps — Land of this type has variable water depths up to six inches 

during the growing season, and is characterized by such woody species as alder, 

buttonbrush, dogwood and willows. 

Wooded Swamp — Land of this type is characterized by variable water depths 

(frequently a foot or more) and a wide variety of herbaceous and mature woody 

vegetation characterized primarily by red maple, black spruce, larch, hemlock 

and white cedar. 

COASTAL WETLANDS 

Tidal Flat — Land of this type is frequently found in shallow bays and estuaries 
and offshore from sandy beaches. These areas are generally devoid of vegetation 
and have either sand, mud or rocky bottoms. 



22 



Salt Marsh — Three general classes of marine environment are included in this 
definition; salt meadows, which are characterized by a few inches of water at high 
tide; irregularly flooded salt marshes, those areas which are covered with a few 
inches of water during the highest monthly tides; regularly flooded salt marshes, 
which are those areas covered by up to a foot of water at high tide. Vegetation is 
primarily Spartina alterniflora, Spartina patens, Salicornia sp., Distichlis spicata 
and Juncus roemarianus. In bays and fresh water estuaries there is frequently a 
fringe marsh of vegetation typical of more fresh water environments. 

Seconded. Mr. Sokolov stated that there were many technical objections to last 
year's proposed by-law; therefore the Planning Board and the Conservation 
Commission cooperated to produce a more precise law. The Planning Board, 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, the Board of Health, Conservation 
Commission — all recommended unanimously. The question was moved and the 
motion carried with 346 voting in the affirmative, 22 in the negative. 

Article 31. : To see what action the Town will take to appropriate a sum of money 
to purchase for conservation purposes a certain parcel of land in the Dow Brook 
watershed of approximately eleven (11) acres now owned by Everett Jewett, and 
to see what method the Town will adopt to raise and appropriate such sum by 
borrowing or otherwise... or take any action with respect thereto. 

Moved by Mr. Winthrop that the Town authorize the Selectmen to raise 
and appropriate $5,000.00 to acquire by purchase under Chapter 40, Section 8c for 
conservation purposes in behalf of the Conservation Commission, a certain parcel 
of land situated on the westerly side of Dow Reservoir in Ipswich, Essex County, 
Massachusetts, being bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a drill hole in a stone wall by land of Town of Ipswich, said point 
being the most northeasterly corner of the parcel herein described, and running S 
27°48'30"E along said stone wall by land of said Ipswich one hundred twenty- two 
and ninety-five— hundredths feet (122.95') to drill hole; thence turning and running 
S 37°03'05"W along said stone wall by land of said Ipswich one hundred eighty- two 
and five—tenths feet (182.5') to a point; thence turning and running S 37°30'30"W 
along said stone wall by land of said Ipswich two hundred fifty-one and five— 
hundredths feet (251.05') to a point; thence turning and running S 41°43'05"W along 
said stone wall by land of said Ipswich seventy-one and eighty-two— hundredths 
feet (71.82') to a point in the corner of the wall at land of the Estate of Anthony K. 
Galicki; thence turning and running N 39°34'45"W along said stone wall by land of 
said Galicki five hundred forty- three feet (543') to a point; thence turning and 
running N 38°00"10"W along said stone wall by land of said Galicki and land of 
Edward J. Smolenski five hundred twenty-nine and fifteen— hundredths feet 
(529.15') to a corner in the said wall; thence turning and running N 45°11'00"W 
along said stone wall by land of said Smolenski one hundred twenty-nine and 
twenty-three— hundredths feet (129.23') to a drill hole at land of said Town of Ips- 
wich; thence turning and running N 45°04'45"E along said stone wall by land of 
said Ipswich three hundred one and one— tenth feet (301.1') to a point; thence turn- 
ing and running S 43°56'05"E by land of said Ipswich four hundred fifty and eight- 
tenths feet (450.8') to a drill hole set in the end of a stone wall; thence turning and 
running S 38°39'50"E along said stone wall by land of said Ipswich forty- two and 
fifty-nine— hundredths feet (42.59') to a drill hole; thence turning and running S 
54°08'55"E along said stone wall by land of said Ipswich one hundred fifty and fifty- 
nine— hundredths feet (150.59') to a drill hole; thence turning and running S 
75°08'05"E along said stone wall by land of said Ipswich one hundred three and 
seven— hundredths feet (103.07') to a drill hole; thence turning and running S 



23 



47°27'50"E along said stone wall by land of said Ipswich two hundred thirty-five 
and eighty-eight feet (235.88') to the point of the beginning. 

Said parcel contains 12.0 acres more or less and is shown on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Land located in Ipswich, Mass. surveyed for Ipswich Conservation 
Commission, scale 1" — 40', Feb. 19, 1974, John A. Goodwin, Surveyor." 

The Conservation Commission is to be authorized to enter into such agreements as 
may be necessary for the purposes of this article; and the land is to be managed 
and under the control of the Conservation Commission. 

Seconded. Mr. Winthrop stated that the Conservation Commission is applying for 
State funding and there is a chance of getting a 50 percent reimbursement. Board 
of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board unanimously recommended. 
Motion carried on unanimous voice vote. 

Town Counsel Vincent moved that the Town vote to reconsider its action under 
Article 4 of this Meeting to the extent and only to the extent of reconsidering the 
appropriation of $369,590.00 for the School Department, Other School Services and 
Athletics, for the reason that said sum under School Department Budget, Class 33, 
Transportation, Line item 7335, Out— Town Bus, contains an appropriation of Town 
funds prohibited by law. Seconded. 

Mr. Vincent had spoken to the Director of Accounts, who told him that a direct 
payment to parents in lieu of busing is illegal. Mr. Gahm asked whether the motion 
was in order. The Moderator advised that it was, but he felt it was unfair to bring 
the matter up for reconsideration without advertising, since there were only half 
the people present that had been there last night. After a long discussion, Mr. 
Navarro asked for indefinite postponement; the Finance Committee supported 
that motion since the question had been voted previously with no questions being 
raised. Mr. Navarro remarked that if it was illegal, the payments would not be 
made and the money would be returned to surplus revenue at the end of the year. 
The motion to indefinitely postpone the motion to reconsider was carried with 245 
voting in the affirmative, 140 in the negative. 

Article 32.: To see whether or not the Town of Ipswich will appropriate a certain 
sum of money for the construction of a bandstand, and to see what method the 
Town will adopt to raise and appropriate such sum by borrowing or otherwise... or 
take any action with respect thereto. 

Moved by Dennis Cameron that the Town raise and appropriate a sum 
of $8,500.00 for the construction of a bandstand as part of the Bicentennial 
celebration. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended, 
though with reservations about the congestion in the Winthrop School area where it 
is planned to build a vandalproof bandstand that will, the Committee claimed, 
provide a stage for plays, band concerts, public speaking. The final decision on the 
site will be left up to the Selectmen. Graham Reedy protested that the Little 
League and girls' sports are in desperate need of playing fields and a bandstand is 
not necessary. The motion carried with 194 voting in the affirmative, 159 in the 
negative. 

Article 33. : To see whether or not the Town of Ipswich will appropriate a sum of 
money for the renovation, restoration, and repair of the interior of the Ipswich 
Town Hall, and to see what method the Town will adopt to raise and appropriate 
such sum by borrowing otherwise... or take any action with respect thereto. 



24 



Moved by Leland Carter that this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 34. : To see whether or not the Town of Ipswich will appropriate a sum of 
money for the planning, equipping, and construction of a river walkway and ad- 
jacent park from Green Street to County Street along the northerly bank of the Ips- 
wich River on land owned by the Town of Ipswich, and to see what method the 
Town will adopt to raise and appropriate such sum by borrowing or otherwise... or 
take any action with respect thereto. 

Moved by Sarah Weatherall that the Town raise and appropriate a sum 
of $9,300.00 for the planning, equipping and construction of a river walkway and 
adjacent park from Green Street to County Street along the northerly bank of the 
Ipswich River on land owned by the Town of Ipswich. Seconded. Board of Select- 
men, Finance Committee, Conservation Commission recommended. The motion 
carried by voice vote. 

Article 35.: To see whether or not the Town of Ipswich will appropriate a sum of 
money for the planning, equipping, and construction of a river walkway and ad- 
jacent pond and park on land now owned by the Ipswich Historical Society along 
the southerly bank of the Ipswich River, and to see what method the Town will 
adopt to raise and appropriate such sum by borrowing or otherwise... or take any 
action with respect thereto. 

Moved by Paul Gillespie that the Town raise and appropriate a sum of 
$15,000.00 for the planning, equipping and construction of a river walkway and 
adjacent pond and park on land owned by the Ipswich Historical Society along the 
southerly bank of the Ipswich River, in the event that the Town has been granted a 
conservation easement, authorized by General Laws, Chapter 184, Section 31-33, 
prior to any work or expense by the Town pursuant to this motion. Seconded. 

Mr. Gillespie explained that this was part of the plan drawn up by the Harvard 
School of Design; the walkway would run in back of the Whipple House along the 
river to the rear of the cemetery; the pond would be used for skating in the winter. 
Board of Selectmen recommended 3-2. The Finance Committee recommended 
against by a vote of 4-4-1. Mr. Daniel B. Lunt, Sr., President of the Historical 
Society, stated that the Society had voted to donate to the Town a valuable piece of 
property on the southerly side of the river with no strings attached, no money in- 
volved, only moral strings in that the Town must improve and maintain the 
property. Mrs. A. W. Smith remembered a pond existing at that spot many years 
ago; this plan is to bring it back. Leo MarcAurele reminded the meeting that 
seventeen years ago the Rotary Club raised money to develop Daniel Boone Park; 
the money is still in the bank, the park has not been taken care of and has been 
vandalized. Chief Brouillette mentioned that he had been to San Antonio, Texas, 
and saw what had been done along the banks of the river that flows through the 
town to beautify the whole area. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 36.: To see whether or not the Town of Ipswich will accept from the Ips- 
wich Historical Society easements in connection with land owned by the Ipswich 
Historical Society on the southerly bank of the Ipswich River, and to see what 
method the Town will adopt to raise and appropriate such sum by borrowing or 
otherwise... or take any action with respect thereto. 



25 



Moved by Paul Gillespie that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to 
accept on behalf of the Town of Ipswich a conservation restriction and easement in 
a certain parcel of land owned by the Ipswich Historical Society, situate on South 
Main Street and consisting of four (4) acres more or less, being known as Lot A as 
shown on Plan 340B filed with Certificate of Title No. 3105 in the South Registry 
District of Essex County July 16, 1926. Seconded. 

Mr. Lunt, Sr. had spoken on this article during consideration of the previous 
one. Mr. Gillespie urged that the property be accepted with sincere thanks and 
appreciation. Board of Selectmen recommended, the Finance Committee 
recommended 8-1. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 36A. : To see what action the Town will take on the preliminary report on 
the Ipswich Comprehensive Plan. 

Moved by Mr. Prosser that this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Seconded. Mr. Prosser stated that as soon as the Plan is finished, it will be printed 
and delivered to all residents, asked that it be read and studied carefully before 
being considered at the next Town Meeting. Unanimous voice vote. 



Article 37. : To see whether or not the Town of Ipswich will appropriate a sum of 
money for the planning, equipping, and construction of a public rest room facility 
within the Town of Ipswich, and to see what method the Town will adopt to raise 
and appropriate such sum by borrowing or otherwise... or take any action with 
respect thereto. 

Moved by Louis Geoffrion that this article be indefinitely postponed; his 
committee feels this is a necessary facility for Bicentennial program but the Board 
of Selectmen and the Finance Committee raised questions to which they do not yet 
have the answers. Seconded. Motion carried by voice vote. 

Article 38. : To see whether or not the Town will designate public ways within the 
Town of Ipswich for use as bicycle paths, or take any action with respect thereto. 

Moved by Jean Bucklin that this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 39. : To see whether or not the Town will amend .the hunting by-law 
adopted by vote of the Town Meeting March 5, 1962, so as to limit hunting on salt- 
marshland without the permission of the owner or legal occupant by striking from 
said by-law the words "and further provided that this by-law shall not apply to 
hunting or use of firearms on salt- marshland. ' ' 

Moved by Attorney Raymond Sullivan that the upland hunting by-law be 
amended by striking therefrom the words "and further provided that this by-law 
shall not apply to hunting or use of firearms on salt marshland." seconded. Mr. 
Sullivan explained the present law, and told of problems many landowners (of 
marshland) have had with hunters who refuse to leave their property or stop hunt- 
ing on it. Board of Selectmen recommended 4-1 against the article, feeling that the 
present by-law is adequate. The Finance Committee recommended 5-4 against the 
article for the same reasons. William George of Conservation Commission spoke 
against article; Dr. Goodale of same Commission spoke for it, telling of his 
problems as a marshland owner. John Donovan, the petitioner, explained 



26 



problems he had had, including shooting of his pet dog by hunters. Chief Brouillette 
stated he gave up hunting in Ipswich because of vague boundaries and unknown 
owners; agreed there were abuses but if the law were changed, we would need to 
add more men to the Police force. The question was moved and the vote on the 
article was 174 for it, 185 against it. The motion was defeated. 

Article 40.: Will the town of Ipswich petition the General Court under Article 
LXXXIX of the amendments to the Massachusetts Constitution for special 
legislation authorizing it to delete or reduce any items in the school budget on 
approval of two-thirds of the persons present and voting at a town meeting, to 
exempt the Town of Ipswich from the operation of the last sentence of Section 7 of 
Chapter 150E of the General Laws and from binding arbitration of school budgets. 

Moved by T. Lincoln Morrison that the Town of Ipswich instruct and 
direct its Selectmen to forthwith file a petition with the General Court for 
legislation substantially as follows: "An Act further Regulating the Support of 
Schools by the Town of Ipswich. Section 1. Notwithstanding the provisions of 
Section 34 of Chapter 71 of the General Laws, Town Meeting of the Town of Ips- 
wich, on the approval of at least two-thirds of the persons present and voting, may 
delete or reduce any item in the school budget. Section 2. The last sentence of 
Section 7 of Chapter 150E of the General Laws shall not apply to the Town of Ips- 
wich. Section 3. The last words of the fifth paragraph of Section 9 of said Chapter 
shall not apply to the Town of Ipswich." Seconded. 

The Finance Committee recommended. Mr. Gahm stated that the School 
Committee had taken no stand on the motion as a group; he felt that a two-thirds 
vote should be a four-fifths vote and he would support such a change. Mr. Dalton 
suggested he propose such an article. Mr. Dalton also said that the School Com- 
mittee is the only one that does not have to go before the Finance Committee and 
he felt that the change might be a restraining influence on it. Kathy Moore, stating 
that the School Committee was certainly not spendthrift, "moved to amend the 
motion on Article 40 to vote separately on Section 1, Section 2, and Section 3." 
Seconded. Motion defeated. Question on original motion moved, was defeated with 
136 voting in the affirmative, 181 in the negative. 

Article 41.: Will the Town of Ipswich petition the General Court under Article 
LXXXIX of the amendments to the Massachusetts Constitution for special 
legislation authorizing it to prevent arbitration of fire fighter and police officer 
agreements. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested copies thereof, 
at the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the town, and by publication 
seven days at least prior to the time for holding said meeting, in a newspaper 
published in, or having a general circulation in the Town of Ipswich. 

Moved by Thomas Emery that the Town of Ipswich instruct and direct 
its Selectmen to forthwith file a petition with the General Court for legislation 
substantially as follows: "Section 4 of Chapter 1078 of the Acts of 1973 shall not 
apply to the Town of Ipswich." Seconded. 

Mr. Emery said that the cost of municipal government is rising, due in large 
part to persons working for the Town. Board of Selectmen recommended. Chief 
Brouillette explained bargaining procedures, urged defeat of article. Mr. Dalton 
urged support, felt police officers are very fairly paid. Sgt. Carpenter explained 
how bargaining had been conducted in the past, requests for more men ignored, 



27 



incentive pay held up. force spread very thinly around the town; he felt the 
Finance Committee deals with facts and figures, rather than human beings, and 
urged defeat of the article. The question was moved, and the motion was defeated 
with 40 voting in the affirmative. 211 in the negative. 

A motion was made and seconded that the Meeting be dissolved. Carried by 
voice vote. The Moderator declared the Meeting dissolved at 10: 35 p.m. 



ATTEST: 



Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
Ipswich High School June 27. 1974 

Essex ss. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County. 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby directed 
to notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, 
to meet at the Ipswich High School, in said Ipswich on 

THURSDAY, THE TWENTY-SEVENTH DAY OF JUNE, 1974 
at 7: 30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator Harold Shively called the meeting to order at 7: 30 p.m.. announcing 
that 333 people were present and the quorum needed was 322. A final count showed 
684 voters in attendance. 

The following tellers were appointed by the Moderator: Homer Mohr. Nathaniel 
Quint, John Griffin. Evelyn Lovely. Charles Schwartz*, and Toni McManaway, Ben 
Collins. 

Town Clerk Harold Comeau read the opening and closing paragraphs of the 
Warrant and the Constable's Return. 

Selectmen Chairman Joseph A. Navarro moved that visitors and students be 
allowed to take seats along the front wall. Seconded. Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 1. 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote passed by the Town under Ar- 
ticle 14 of the Warrant for the 1973 Annual Town Meeting by reducing the amount of 
the appropriation made therein for the construction of sewers, sewerage systems 
and sewage treatment and disposal facilities and by providing that Federal or 
State Aid available for such construction may be spent in addition to such ap- 
propriation (the total estimated cost of the project being $4,400,000) ; to determine 
whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Moved by Town Manager Leonard Silvia to amend the vote passed by the 
Town under Article 14 of the Warrant for the 1973 Annual Town Meeting to read as 
follows: Voted: (1) that $440,000 is appropriated for the construction of sewers, 
sewerage system and sewage treatment and disposal facilities ( the total estimated 



28 



cost of the project being $4,400,000) ; (2) that to raise this appropriation, $100,000.00 
is transferred from Sewer Receipts Reserve, and the Treasurer with the approval 
of the Selectmen is authorized to issue $340,000 bonds or notes of the Town under 
Chapter 44, Section 8 (15) of the General Laws as amended; (3) that the Town 
Manager with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to carry out said project 
and to contract for and expend State and Federal construction grants for the 
project in addition to the amount appropriated above, provided that the Selectmen 
determine that at least 70 percent of the eligible cost of the project is available 
from such grants; and (4) that the bond authorization voted under Article 16 of the 
Warrant for the 1969 Annual Town Meeting is hereby rescinded. Seconded. 
Selectmen recommended. Finance Committee recommended. The motion carries 
with 711 voting in the affirmative. 1 in the negative. 

Article 2. 

To see whether the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to fund the 
Police Educational Incentive Program; said monies to be paid from available 
funds or by borrowing. 

Moved by Town Manager Leonard Silvia that the Town appropriate the 
sum of seven thousand eighty-six dollars and sixty-seven cents ($7,086.67) from 
available funds in the Treasury (free cash) said sum to be transferred to the Police 
Department Incentive Program Account to fund the Police Educational Incentive 
Program for the period January 1 thru June 30, 1974. Seconded. Finance Com- 
mittee recommended. Selectmen recommended. Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 3. 

To see what action the Town will take on the preliminary report on the Ipswich 
Comprehensive Plan. 

Moved by Planning Board Member John Prosser that the Town approve 
the Progress Report of the Ipswich Master Plan, Ipswich Planning Board June, 
1974. Finance Committee recommended. Selectmen recommended. 

Moved by Mr. James McCormack that Article 3 be indefinitely postponed. 

There was much discussion about this Article, pro and con. 

The motion for postponement was defeated. 

The motion to accept Article 3 was unanimously approved. 

Town Counsel Dale Vincent moved for reconsideration of Article 1, the motion 
carried unanimously. 

Town Counsel Dale Vincent moved that a recount be made on Article 1, the 
motion carried unanimously. 

Article 1 carried 642 voting in the affirmative, 1 in the negative. 

Moved by Chairman Selectmen Joseph A. Navarro that the meeting be 
adjourned. Seconded. Unanimous Voice Vote. 

The Moderator declared the Meeting adjourned at 8 : 40 p. m. 

ATTEST: 

Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 

29 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL NOVEMBER 25, 1974 

ESSEX, SS 

To the Constable of the town of Ipswich in said County. 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby directed 
to notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, 
to meet at the Ipswich High School, in said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE TWENTY-FIFTH DAY OF NOVEMBER 1974 
at 7: 30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator Harold Shively called the meeting to order at 7:30 p.m. and an- 
nounced that only 249 people were present, with a quorum of 312 needed. Selectmen 
Chairman Joseph A. Navarro moved that the meeting be postponed for fifteen 
minutes to allow people a chance to get into the hall. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote. At 7:44 p.m. the Moderator announced that there was a quorum present. A 
final count showed 408 voters in attendance. 

The Moderator appointed the following as tellers: William George, Elizabeth 
Seitz, Sheila Beyer, Edmund Traverso, John Griffin. 

Town Clerk Harold G. Comeau read the opening and closing pragraphs of the 
Warrant, and the Constable's Return. The Moderator asked all present to stand for 
a moment of silence in memory of the late George J. Geanakos. Mr. Navarro asked 
that visitors and students be allowed to sit along the front wall of the hall. Secon- 
ded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 1.: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to fund 
Senior Home Care Services Inc., to provide services to the residents of the Town of 
Ipswich, and to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by 
borrowing, transfer from available funds or free cash or otherwise, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Navarro moved that the Town transfer the sum of $2,640. from Free 
Cash to the Selectmen's Budget to fund the Senior Home Care Services, Inc. 
program. Seconded. He explained that this program helps senior citizens with 
meals, homemaker and health services, and the amount requested is reim- 
bursable by State funds. Chairman Charles Dalton stated that the Finance Com- 
mittee recommended 7-1 abstention in favor. The motion carried on a unanimous 
voice vote. 

Article 2.: To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate to pay unpaid 
bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid, and to determine whether 
such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds or 
free cash or otherwise, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Charles Cobb, Jr. moved that the Town transfer from free cash the 
following amounts to pay for unpaid bills as follows: 



30 



Recreation: 

James P. McCormack $ 289.70 

Coleman's Sporting Goods 167.61 

S&SArts& Crafts 522.40 

Horton Handicraft 484.92 

Essex County Co-op. 125.00 

Agway, Inc. 74.00 

Southside Greenhouse 843.75 

E. G. Washbourn 200.00 

$2,707.38 

Equipment Maintenance: 

R&R Auto Body $ 225.00 

Toby Ford Sales 497.84 

$ 722.84 
TOTAL $3,430.22 

Seconded. Finance Committee approved unanimously. Motion carried on a 
unanimous voice vote. 



Article 3. : To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to fund 
the School Bus Contract, and to determine whether such appropriation shall be 
raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds or free cash or otherwise, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Paul Gahm moved that the Town appropriate the sum of $44,680. for 
School Department transportation for the purpose of supplementing the amount 
appropriated for that purpose at the last Annual Town Meeting, March 1974 and 
that this sum be transferred for this purpose from free cash. Seconded. Mr. Gahm 
gave the background for the request. Mr. Navarro stated that the Selectmen were 
unanimously in favor; Dr. Waite stated the Finance Committee was unanimously 
in favor. Motion carried on a voice vote. 



Article 4. : To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to fund 
salaries and wages of the Firefighters Operating Budget, and to determine 
whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from available 
funds of free cash or otherwise, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Navarro moved that the Town transfer from free cash the following 
sums to fund the Firefighters' Budget: 

Class 1 - 21 Fire Chief $ 1,160. 

1-22 Captains 2,178. 

1 - 41 Firefighters 9,485. 

1 - 60 Overtime 25,000. 

1 - 64 Firefighter 5,000. 

1 - 68 Longevity 2,875. 

$45,698. 

Seconded. Mr. Navaro stated that the Selectmen supported the Article 
unanimously and gave their reasons. Mary Conley for the Finance Committee 
explained its reasons for unanimously opposing the Article. Attorney Joseph 
Sandulli, Union President Larry Jordan, Town Manager Leonard Silvia spoke in 



31 



favor; John Prosser of the Planning Board, Warren Tennant, Crocker Snow, 
Charles Dalton, William Markos spoke against. On a hand count, the motion was 
defeated with 105 voting in the affirmative, 239 in the negative. 

Article 5.: To see if the Town will reinstate the former Waterway Study 
Committee for the purpose of concluding necessary action on local issues, 
requirements, cost and intent relative to the pending Ipswich River Improvement 
Project as approved by the Federal Government. 

Walter Pietrowicz moved to see if the Town will reinstate the former 
Waterways Study Committee for the purpose of concluding necessary action on 
local issues, requirements, cost and intent relative to the pending Ipswich River 
Improvement project as approved by the Federal Government. Seconded. Mr. 
Pietrowicz explained what he envisioned, said that no funds are needed at this 
time. Mr. Cobb for the Selectmen stated they were opposed to the Article, feeling it 
would cost more than the Town can afford. Thomas Emery for the Finance 
Committee stated that they were opposed 6-2. Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. moved indefinite 
postponement of the Article. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 6.: To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to pur- 
chase a Chipper for the Forestry Department, and to determine whether such 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds or free 
cash or otherwise, or take any other action relative thereto. 

John Pickard moved that the Town transfer the sum of $5,900. from free 
cash to purchase a chipper for the Forestry Division. Seconded. The Selectmen 
favored the Article unanimously. George Tsoutsouris said that the Finance 
Committee would have preferred that this item be put in the regular budget but 
realized that it was a necessity and were 7-1 in favor. The motion carried on a 
unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. Navarro moved that the meeting be dissolved. Seconded. Carried by voice 
vote. The Moderator declared the Meeting dissolved at 9 : 28 p. m. 

ATTEST: 

Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 



32 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN (House ofHinlin) 

(l-r) Charles K. Cobb, Joseph A. Navarro, Chairman, Edwin H. Damon, 
Edward Kozeneski, John M. Pickard. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Joseph A. JNavarro, Chairman 

This past year has been one of progress as the Town grows. The Board of 
Selectmen has had an excellent relationship with the Town Manager. He in turn 
has been responsive to the Board and to the people of the community. 

The consolidations of our financial departments into one area in the Elm Street 
Light Building will make for greater efficiency of operation and we hope a con- 
venient method for you to transact your business with the Town. 

The acquisition of the former Radar building at the end of Town Farm Road at 
no cost also provides us with much needed space for our Water and Sewer 
Departments. 

We look forward to reaching a final decision regarding the future water sup- 
ply. Additionally, we plan to continue the expansion of our sewer system and 
improvements to the existing water system. 

A long overlooked segment of the municipal service has been the Public Safety 
Departments. We will be devoting a great deal of time and study to increasing 
their capabilities and effectiveness. 



33 




TOWN MANAGER 

Leonard J. Silvia 

1974 was a year of crisis throughout our land. At all levels of government there 
is a cry for leadership. For many of our neighbors it was a year without work and a 
year of frustration. At year's end the economic picture was bleak. 

Locally, the high point of activity was commencement of our secondary sewer 
treatment plant off Fowler's Lane. This $4.4 million project is slated for com- 
pletion early in 1976. It should have a beneficial effect for many taxpayers. 

The bicentennial's walkway and park on County Street and the river walkway 
and pond near the Whipple House have been the source of much positive comment. 
They will be a lasting memorial to our bicentennial. 

In the fall we installed an electronic accounting machine in the Accountant's 
Office which I expect will sharply increase the information system necessary to 
carry on the function of good government. 

Personally, I think that 1974 was a year of stability and progressive govern- 
ment. Hopefully, the year ahead will see new avenues opened towards progressive 
responsive town government. 

Throughout this town report, department heads have given a rather com- 
prehensive picture of your government. Therefore, I will not comment in depth. 

Rather, I should like to comment on the question of long-range planning and 
development of this community. 

I suspect that each generation rightly believes that its generation is making 
the critical choices. In a way that is true, but the choices do not become critical 
until a major trend is determined that, once made, is irrevocable in its effects on 
the character of the community. Are we at that point now? Barometers would 
indicate that we are. 

34 



It reduces itself to one fundamental question. Is Ipswich going to retain its 
rural character and amenities, or is it to follow the path of an urban sprawl. There 
is no question that the battle lines are forming, and our community is not the only 
one involved. 

The incremental accumulation of the problems facing civilization, justify the 
need for stabilization and positive attempts have to be made. 

The essence of our local democratic process relies heavily not only on par- 
ticipation by the citizenry but on the theory that local governments representing 
the citizenry are manageable and thereby responsive and accountable to those 
they represent. 

My premise is that there is an organizational break-even point beyond which 
local government becomes unmanageable, costly, inefficient and, more im- 
portantly, fails in its primary role of being a respected, responsive service function 
to the individual to whom it should be providing the service. 

This same concept of management can be extended beyond the governmental 
role to the community as a whole. The complex systems necessary to deliver the 
necessities of life become increasingly vulnerable because of their complexity. It 
would appear obvious that the theory of near self-sufficiency should become the 
goal of those communities still fortunate enough to find themselves in a stage of 
development which allows this goal to be feasible. The communities ( the cities and 
congested metropolitan areas are the obvious examples) that expand beyond their 
ability to provide, but, more importantly, to control the delivery of the necessities 
become pawns to the whims or weaknesses of systems beyond their control. 

We should, therefore, attempt to retain and possibly expand those resources 
which we presently have, whether they be farms, watersheds, open space, 
recycling efforts, or any other resource which can be either in a large or small way 
a factor in accomplishing the long-range goal of near self-sufficiency. The em- 
phasis on the processes necessary to attain this goal will cause temporary 
sacrifices and displeasure, but results can provide untold benefits to generations of 
Ipswichites yet to come. 

Surely the town will survive and manage under the most inconclusive cir- 
cumstances, but this town's pride and heritage must always be protected and that 
challenge must be met. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Harold Comeau, Town Clerk 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded for the past four years: 

1971 1972 1973 1974 

Births 149 109 115 121 

Deaths 141 154 140 138 

Marriages 121 123 137 123 

All the births recorded were to Ipswich residents ( male 70 - female 51) . Of the total 
numbers of deaths recorded 93 were residents ( male 50 - female 43) . The age of the 
oldest Ipswich resident was 104 years, 1 month and 10 days. 

35 



1973 


1974 


496 


416 


47 


41 


295 


271 


7 


7 


845 


735 


1973 


1974 


711 


757 


307 


278 


197 


341 


1215 


1376 



DOG LICENSES 

Males 
Female 

Spayed Female 
Kennels 
TOTAL 

CLAM PERMITS 

Residents 

Non-residents Daily 
Non-residents Yearly 
TOTAL 

REGISTERED VOTERS (as of December 31, 1974) 

Precinct Democrats Republicans Unenrolled Total 

I 259 551 526 1336 

II 434 622 809 1865 

III 250 438 671 1359 

IV 445 439 786 1670 
TOTAL 1388 2050 2792 6230 

ELECTIONS 

The annual meeting for the election of Town officers was held in accordance 
with the warrant on Monday, March 11, 1974 from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The 
voting machine in Precinct I registered 718 ballots cast, Precinct II registered 906 
ballots cast, Precinct III registered 588 ballots cast, and Precinct IV registered 916 
ballots cast. 



Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. 

I II III IV Total 



MODERATOR 
Harold Shively 
Blank 

SELECTMEN 
Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 
Cornelius Cleary 
Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 
John R. Logan 
Blank 

CONSTABLE 
Bernie Spencer 
Weymouth Atkinson, Jr. 
David L. Welsh 
Blank 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Jacob D. Darnell, Jr. 
Annette I. George 
M. Patricia Manning 
Graham M. Reedy 
Robert K.Weatherall 
Peter Zervas 
Blank 



574 


708 


479 


636 


2397 


144 


198 


109 


280 


730 


473 


530 


302 


366 


1671 


266 


389 


285 


477 


1417 


346 


440 


293 


520 


1599 


203 


250 


185 


251 


889 


148 


203 


111 


218 


680 


547 


661 


441 


632 


2281 


80 


121 


63 


129 


393 


62 


76 


62 


87 


287 


29 


48 


22 


68 


167 


57 


91 


75 


67 


290 


295 


350 


237 


292 


1174 


419 


550 


319 


605 


1893 


148 


250 


183 


342 


923 


342 


363 
4 


228 


238 


1171 
4 


175 


208 


134 


288 


801 



36 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Harold D. Bowen 
Walter Dziadul 
Albert Harkness III 
Blank 



415 


492 


291 


365 


1563 


192 


237 


182 


448 


1059 


77 


114 


66 


51 


308 


34 


63 


49 


52 


198 




DEPARTMENT HEADS (House ofHinlin) 

(bottom row l-r). Varnum S. Pedrick, Assessor — Cjathleen McGinley, 
Youth Director — Bernie Spencer, Constable — Harold G. Comeau, Town 
Clerk — Maura Quinn, Dog Officer — James H. Daly, Recreation and 
Parks Director — Ralph L. Hebert, Building Inspector — Edwin N. 
Bronk, Health Agent. 

(top row l-r) George C. Mourikas, Treasurer and Collector — Walter 
Hulbert, Cemetery Director — Peter George, Harbor Master — Frank 
Story, Veteran's Agent — Armand Michaud, Tree Warden — Richard 
Sheppard, Shellfish Constable — Alfred Tobiasz, Electric Light Manager 
— Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian — Armand R. Brouillette, Police Chief, 
missing from picture — Theodore F. Mozdziez, Fire Chief — Kevin D. 
McElhinney, Public Works Director — Robert H. Leet, Accountant — F. 
Dale Vincent, Legal Counsel — John Harrigan, Civil Defense Director — 
Harold Shively, Moderator. 



37 



YOUTH COMMISSION 

Cathleen R. McGinley Director 
W. Robert Russell M.S. Chairman 

1974 has been a full and very successful year at the Drop In Center. The 
building has been completely renovated and equipped through the generosity of 
the Friends of Ipswich Youth, a private non-profit group which took over owner- 
ship of the building in January, 1974. 

In return for the generous support of the Drop In Center by the townspeople, 
the teenagers have performed a number of civic and community projects during 
the past year, which include the following: 

Delivery of Town Reports 

Town Wide Cleanup on two different occasions 

Delivery of the Master Plan Report 

Participation in Olde Ipswich Days 

Cleanup of the River Walkway 

Complete renovation of the Drop In Center 

Volunteer Work with the Public Schools 

Major Activities the Youth Commission has been responsible for include the 
following: 

Arts & Crafts Projects 

4 Summer Concerts at Castle Barn 

Block Dance during Olde Ipswich Days 

10 Dances 

Roller Skating Trips 

Ice Skating Trips 

Summer Cookout & Sports 

Creation of a Snack Bar at the Center 

Counseling of Young People 

Sponsor of Marathon 

A special note of appreciation is extended to the volunteers who gave so freely 
of their time to assist our youth at the Drop In Center. The many contributions and 
donations of furniture from the Community are truly appreciated. Special thanks 
are extended to the Police Chief and his Department for their interest and 
cooperation. 



ASSESSOR'S OFFICE 

Varnum S. Pedrick, Chief Assessor 

The total assessed value of real estate and personal property committed to the 
collector for collection was $71,364,548. This is an increase of about two million 
dollars over 1973. 

We also committed $473,658.58 in motor vehicle excise taxes which was an 
increase of 130,000 over 1973. 



38 



We do not expect a large gain in new taxable property as far as real estate is 
concerned because new construction has fallen off, due to high material and labor 
costs and tight mortgage money. 

We expect a substantial increase in personal property due to the resumation of 
boat and snowmobile taxation. 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Hollie A. Bucklin, Jr., Chairman 

In 1974, the Board of Appeals held 34 hearings. Of these, one was withdrawn, 
five were denied, and 28 were granted. 

By granting 28 petitions, the Board has demonstrated its liberal attitude as 
well as its willingness to work with the residents of the Town to find the necessary 
legal reasons that would allow it to vary the Zoning By-law and yet allow full 
protection of that law to neighbors and abuttors. 

The Board now sits on a regular basis, the third Thursday of each month, and 
has an open period prior to the formal meetings whereby any person with zoning 
problems can discuss with the Board those problems and obtain informal advice 
from it onJiow to proceed to obtain a solution. 

The Board looks back at 1974 with a great sense of accomplishment; it has 
faced and solved many diverse problems, from the disposal of manure to the 
granting of a variance to construct 94 living units to the Housing Authority. 



TOWN COUNSEL 

F. Dale Vincent, Jr. 



In addition to the regular advisory services rendered town officials and Boards 
throughout the past year, the town continued to become increasingly involved in 
litigation and problems that approached litigation. 

There are presently three cases pending in Superior Court involving the 
propriety of withholding variances or special permits by the Board of Appeals, and 
one case in which the Board of Appeals, holding an opinion at variance with this 
office with respect to one provision of the Zoning By-law, has hired outside counsel 
to attempt to enforce their interpretation of the By-law in Superior Court. There 
are also three suits against the town for defects in public ways which are not 
covered by liability insurance. There is a suit against the Assessor to determine 
whether adequate access to records of that office has been afforded to certain 
newspaper reporters, and a suit to seek damages for non-compliance with an 
approved subdivision plan, and a suit against the town as a third party defendant 
that is seeking to collect damages from the town for alleged improper approval of 
a septic system. The suit against the Planning Board involving their refusal to 
approve a subdivision plan, which was won in Superior Court by the town, has been 
appealed to the Appeals Court, and a companion suit against the Board of Health is 
held pending the outcome of the case in the Appeals Court against the Planning 
Board. 

39 



TREASURER-COLLECTOR 

George C. Mourikas 

Due to the New Fiscal Year there has been a lot of confusion and activity in the 
collection of Real Estate Taxes. The burden of collecting Real Estate Taxes semi- 
annually has been overwhelming. 

The duties of my office staff have doubled due to the Fiscal Year and Revenue 
Sharing, which requires an extra set of books and files, for Real Estate and Per- 
sonal Property Taxes. 

Investments have been made on both the General and Revenue Sharing Ac- 
counts, amounting to several Hundred Thousand Dollars in Interest. 

My staff has been working diligently, which includes Sophie Rygielski, 
Assistant Treasurer; Gloria Klimaszewski and Marjorie Horsman, Deputy Tax 
Collectors. 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John Conley, Chairman 

The Ipswich Historical Commission has been involved during the past year in 
bringing to completion its Demonstration Project on Historic Preservation 
through the acquisition of Preservation Agreements. Although the procedures for 
getting approval from various concerned agencies have taken longer than an- 
ticipated, the Report has been submitted for its final approval to the Office of 
Evaluation in the Department of Housing and Urban Development. 

The Commission has participated in the Town's Bicentennial Celebration 
through its representation on the Bicentennial Committee. The Commission 
sponsored a pamphlet on the "Ipswich Convention" which was researched and 
written by Mrs. Alice Keenan of the Commission and Mrs. Elizabeth Newton, 
Curator of the Whipple House. The pamphlet was distributed at the Town's com- 
memoration of the Ipswich Convention in September. 

The Commission, through its membership on the Historic Subcommittee of the 
Bicentennial Committee, has lent its support to several projects which it hoped 
would come to a successful conclusion during the Bicentennial years of 1975 and 
1976. One is the making of a handsome quilt embroidered with Ipswich scenes by a 
group of women under the leadership of Mrs. Dorothy Brigham. The D.A.R. 
generously assisted the project with a donation for the purchase of some of the 
material. Two other projects in which the Commission is interested are historical 
studies which would make a great contribution to our knowledge of Ipswich's past. 
These would probably require some outside funding, but constitute the kind of 
commemorative action that would have lasting value. 

The Commission has also undertaken the obligation of updating the inventory 
of the Town's historic buildings and sites for the Massachusetts Historical Com- 
mission. 

The Commission has continued to give attention to a considerable volume of 
correspondence and to its program of providing plaques for historic homes and 
buildings. 

40 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
For the Town of 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET- June 30, 1974 



ASSETS 



CASH 






General 


915 


,903.23 


Revenue Sharing 


87 


,061.10 


Petty: 






Accounting 




5.00 


Schools 




105.00 


Electric 




375.00 


Advance: 






Payrolls 




574.92 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 
Payroll Deductions 



1,004,024.25 



CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT : 

Federal Revenue Sharing 1,100.000.00 

1,100,000.00 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE : 
Taxes : 

Real Estate: 

Levy of 1971 802.31 

Levy of 1972 2,928.02 

Levy of 1973 12,236.18 

Levy of 1974 83,088.16 

Personal Property: 

Levy of 1966 3.30 

Levy of 1967 56.25 

Levy of 1969 110.40 

Levy of 1970 278.60 

Levy of 1971 310.80 

Levy of 1972 407.40 

Levy of 1973 2,646.87 

Levy of 1974 3,197.06 

106,065.35 



Excise : 

Motor Vehicle: 
Levy of 1964 
Levy of 1965 
Levy of 1966 
Levy of 1967 
Levy of 1968 
Levy of 1969 
Levy of 1970 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1974 

Farm Animals : 
Levy of 1973 



1,560.38 

2,801.31 

290.41 

1,333.02 

382.49 

171.94 

1,089.72 

1,600.88 

4,558.76 

11,072.45 

83,759.44 

108,620.80 

77.00 
77.00 



State Withholding 


9,906.39 


Contributory Retirement System 


5,398.17 


Group Insurance: 




Deductions 


11,850.90 


Paid In 


264.78 


Consortium 


51.03 


O.M.E. 




Deductions 


127.40 


Paid In 


211.20 


Life Insurance: 




Deductions 


254.62 


Paid In 


11.90 


Consortium 


.55 


Union Dues 


224.50 


School Employees Annuities 


1,663.29 




29,964.73 


Guarantee Deposits 




Bid & Performance Bonds 


24,631.60 


Electric Meters 


10,266.00 


Electric Meters Income 


3,967.45 




38,865.05 


Agency 




County - Dog Licenses 


138.00 




138.00 


Tailings 




Unclaimed checks 


4,867.08 


Gifts & Bequests 




Cemetery Perpetual Care 


560.00 


Ipswich Fairways, Inc. 


10,000.00 


Ascension Memorial Church 


200.00 




10,760.00 


Investment Funds 




Conservation Fund 


18,313.86 


Manning Fund 


297.25 




18,611.61 


Premium on Loans 


565.15 


Interest on Loans 


106.67 


Veterans' Recovery 


576.50 


Federal Grants 




Schools: 




NDEA Title III 


3,650.26 


Vocational Education 


12.28 


ESEA Title I 73-144-037 


317.20 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET- June 30, 1974 



ASSETS 



Special Taxcs t 
In Litigation 



Tax Title & Possessions : 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 

Special Assessments; 
Sewer: 

Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 
Unapportioned 
Paid in Advance 
Committed Interest: 
Levy of 1973 
Paid in Advance 

Departmental : 
Town Property 
Engineering 
Health 

Veterans' Services 
Highway Machinery 
Cemetery 

Municipal Electric : 
Rates & Charges 

Water: 

Rates & Charges 
Liens added to taxes: 

Levy of 1971 

Levy of 1972 

Levy of 1973 

Sewer : 

Rates & Charges 
Liens added to taxes: 

Levy of 1971 

Levy of 1972 

Levy of 1973 

Due from Feoffees : 

Aid to Highways 
State 
County 





LIABILITIES 


& RESERVES 






Federal Grants (aont.) 








1,907.64 


Schools: 












ESEA Title I 74-144-012 


1, 


,485.69 


9,949.74 

7,809.28 

17.759.02 


ESEA Title II 


1973 






263.15 


ESEA Title II 


1974 




3, 


,084.01 


ESEA Library II Spec. 1973 




98.60 


ESEA Library II Spec. 1972 




15.40 




ESEA Title VIB 






902.09 




ESEA Title VIB 




9 


, 447 . 27 


92.12 


Others: 










7,831.41 


Environmental 


Protc 


xtion 


6 


,460.00 


105,364.50 


HUD - Historical 




2 


,651.04 


(20.22) 


HUD - Open Space 




2 


,414.23 




Revenue Sharing 






84 


,061.10 


180.70 








114 


,862.32 


6.10 
113,454.61 


State Grants: 

Youth Commission 






737.40 




Shellfish 






1 


,099.00 


691.48 


Chapter 766 








50.00 


45.00 








1 


,886.40 


172.14 

35,826.93 

690.63 

62.50 


Revolving Funds 
School Lunch 






2 


,107.72 


School Athletics 




1 


,381.24 


37,488.68 


Special Police 






4 


858.00 
,346.96 


114,660.88 


Appropriation Balance 
General 1973 




291 


,650.73 




General 197 4 




6 


,647 


,960.49 


33,583.77 


Revenue Sharing 


1973 




3 


,000.00 




Revenue Sharing 


1974 




75 


,000.00 


162.63 






7 


,017 


,611.22 


(104.03) 
511.47 
34,153.84 


Utility Balance 
E lectric: 

Construction 
Bond Proceeds 






39 


,597.24 
237.04 


27.784.46 


Bond Proceeds 


197 3 




32 


,799.22 




Depreciation 






85 


,783.23 


23.52 


Water: 










(71.77) 


Maintenance & 


Operation 






19.29 




1973 






60.00 


27.755.50 




197 4 




215 


,995.00 


7,500.00 


Dow* s Reservoir Project 




516.69 


Construction 


1969 






430.71 




Construction 


1970 




5 


,664.80 


42,219.54 


Construction 


1971 




1 


,395.55 


19,500.00 


Construction 


1973 




31 


,235.60 


61,719.54 


Plant & Investment 


1973 




37.19 




Plant & Investment 


1974 


58, 


,100.00 










471, 


,852.27 



ASSETS 



Other Assets: 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - June 30, 1974 

LIABILITIES & RESER VES 
Loans Authorized & Unissued: 



Loans Authorized : 
Sewer Construction 

Art 63 TM 3-7-66 
Sewer Treatment Plant 

TM 6/27/74 
Water Mains Lining 

Art 19 TM 3/5/73 



343,000.00 

340,000.00 

160,000.00 
843,000.00 

Unprovided for or Overdrawn Accounts 



Clothing Allowance Ded 

County Tax 

Overlay 1966 

Court Judgment (Fiory) 

Revenue 1974 

Stabilization Fund 



.90 

12,789.33 

26.40 

1,000.00 

6,556,967.32 

203.09 

6,570,987.04 



Overestimates 1973 
State: 

Recreation Areas 
Metropolitan Air 

Pollution Control 
Mosquito Control 
Ipswich River Watershed 



Sale of Cemetery Lots 



843,000.00 



4,710.86 

39.21 

1,825.42 

379.16 

6,954.65 

8,524.95 

ons 



Receipts Reserved for Appropriati 

Road Machinery 25.00 
State Aid: 

Highway 1140 14,739.00 
Library 4,031.25 
County Dog Refund 1,163.04 
Cemetery Perpetual Care- 
Income 10,500.00 
Cemetery Flowers- Income 925.00 



31,383.29 



Reserve Fund-Overlay Surplus 103,327.11 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements 
Levy of 1967 
Levy of 1969 
Levy of 1970 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1974 



Revenue Reserved Until Collecte d 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Farm Animals 
Sewer 

Special Tax 

Tax Title & Possession 
Departmental 
Municipal Light 
Water 
Aid to Highway 

Reserve for Petty Cash Advance 

Surplus Revenue : 
General 

Municipal Light 
Water 
Sewer 



56.25 
110.40 
237.72 
973.11 
3335.42 
14.883.05 
88,337.66 
107,933.61 

108,620.80 
77.00 

141,349.38 

1,907.64 

17,759.02 

41,714.18 

114,660.88 
34,111.52 
61,719.54 

521,919.96 

485.00 



10,149.174.15 



679,687.03 
81,832.30 
15,557.85 
33,554.44 

810,631.62 

10,149.174.15 



Source: Town Accountant 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET- June 30, 197 4 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt 
Inside Debt 
Outside Debt 
Public Service Debt 



792,000.00 
388.000.00 
869,000.00 



Serial Loans 

Inside Debt Limit: 
General 

Sewer Construction 
Payne School Renov. 
Fire Equipment 

Outside Debt Limit: 
General 

Sewer Construction 
School Construction 

Public Service Debt: 
Electric 
Water 



2,049,000.00 



722,000.00 
30,000.00 
40,000. 00 

792,000.00 



280,000.00 
108,000.00 
388,000.00 

399,000.00 
470,000.00 
869,000.00 

2, 049, 000. "00 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 

Not Due 131,514.40 

Suspended Sewer Assessments 

Not Due 2,502.00 



Apportioned Sewer Revenues Due 

1974 .-■--- 12,743.92 

1975 11,759.37 

1976 11,438.97 

1977 10,094.45 

1978 9,891.09 

1979 9,416.42 

1980 8.463.12 

1981 7,911.33 

1982 7.742.71 

1983 6,028.94 

1984 5,743.93 

1985 5,304.30 

1986 5.302.78 

1987 4,802.06 

1988 4,586.17 

1989 3,905.19 

1990 2,584.94 

1991 2,371.26 

1992 1,423.37 



134,016.40 



Suspended Sewer 



131,514.40 

2,502.00 
134,016.40 



Source: Town Accountant 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1974 





January 1 


January 1 


Total 




to Dec. 31 


to June 30 




Taxes: 




Real Estate 








Levy of 1971 


6,006.47 


-0- 


6,006.47 


Levy of 197 2 


86,141.77 


4,543.43 


90,685.20 


Levy of 1973 


3,537,269.92 


49,902.67 


3,587,172.59 


Levy of 1974 


53.63 


1,790,866.75 


1,790,920.38 




3,629,471.79 


1,845,312.85 


5,474,784.64 


Personal Property: 








Levy of 1967 


18.75 


-0- 


18.75 


Levy of 1970 


33.60 


-0- 


33.60 


Levy of 1972 


5,019.95 


-0- 


5,019.95 


Levy of 1973 


83,27 4.24 


2,002.00 


85,276.24 


Levy of 1974 


-0- 


40,488.18 
42,490.18 


40,488.18 




88,346.54 


130,836.72 


Tax Title Redemption 


-0- 


14,668.72 


14,668.72 


In lieu of Taxes: 








State-owned Property 


89,019.63 


-0- 


89,019.63 


Crane's Beach 


10,197.31 


12,705.57 


22,902.88 


Housing Authority 


-0- 


864.00 


864.00 


Veterans' Abatements 


-0- 


1,969.40 
15,538.97 


1,969.40 




99,216.94 


114,755.91 


State General Fund Distribution: 








Machinery Basis 


4,512.27 


4,512.27 


9,024.54 


School Aid Chapter 69 & 71 


235,254.03 


-0- 


235,054.03 


School Aid Chapter 70 


670,665.71 


368,575.31 


1,039,241.02 


School Aid Chapter 70(1972 adj.) 


16.598.61 
927,030.62 


-0- 


16.598.61 




373.087.58 


1,300,118.20 


State Agency Fund Distribution 








Beano Tax 


1,768.67 


9,377.19 


11,145.86 


Local Aid Fund 








Lottery 


56.516.77 


-0- 


56,516.77 


Licenses and Permits 








Alcoholic Beverages 


19,506.00 


124.00 


19,630.00 


All others: 








Selectmen: 








Amusement 


411.00 


147.00 


558.00 


Auto Dealers 


130.00 


76.00 


206.00 


Common Victualers 


93.00 


50.00 


143.00 


Shellfish Permits 


4.020.00 


3,120.00 


7,140.00 


Occupancy Permits 


235.00 


50.00 


285.00 


Auctioneer 


4.00 


8.00 


12.00 


Fuel 


10.00 


-0- 


10.00 


Unclassified 


8.00 


-0- 


8.00 


Town Clerk: 








Clam Permits 


5.500.00 


5,660.00 


11,160.00 


Police: 








License to carry firearms 


1,562.00 


630.00 


2,192.00 


License to sell firearms 


-0- 


40.00 


40.00 


Building Inspector: 








Building Permits 


3-. 06 3. 50 


1,051.00 


4,114.50 


Health & Sanitation: 








Septic Tanks 


360.00 


80.00 


440.00 


Plumbing 


1.391.50 


584.50 


1,976.00 


Gas Permits 


709.00 


226.00 


935.00 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 197 4 





January 1 
to Dec. 31 


January 1 
to June 30 


Total 


Licenses and Permits (cont.) 




Health & Sanitation (cont.) 








Sewer Installers 


110.00 


-0- 


110.00 


Restaurants 


18.00 


21.00 


39.00 


Cabins & Motels 


10.00 


-0- 


10.00 


Milk, Oleo, Ice Cream 


20.00 


-0- 


20.00 


Cesspool Pumping 


75.00 


62.00 


137.00 


Cesspool Pit Fees 


562.00 


272.00 


834.00 


Rendering 


2.00 


-0- 


2.00 


Sewer Connection Fees 


380.00 


180.00 


560.00 


Public Works: 








Street Openings 


195.00 


5.00 


200.00 




38,375.00 


12,386.50 


50,761.50 


Fines & Forfeits 








District Court 


6,270.50 


2,210.00 


8,480.50 


Anti-Trust Actions 


366.65 


7.09 


373.74 


Restitutions 


-0- 


60.00 
2,277.09 


60.00 




6,637.15 


8,914.24 


Grants & Gifts 








Federal: 








NDEA Title III 


2,287.98 


-0- 


2,287.98 


ESEA Title I 74-144-012 


11,632.00 


-0- 


11,632.00 


ESEA Title II Library 


3,467.77 


3,084.01 


6,551.78 


ESEA Title II Special Purpose 


700.00 


-0- 


700.00 


PL Title VIB 


4,493.00 


12,850.00 


17.343.00 


PL Title VID (Chapter 766) 


1,500.00 


4,040.00 


5,540.00 


ESEA Title I 


-0- 


1,782.00 


1,782.00 


Food Service USDA 


39,969.42 


25,530.40 


65,499.82 


Revenue Sharing 


413,870.00 


61,972.00 


475,842.00 


HUD-Open Space Program 


2,414.23 


-0- 


2,414.23 


Storm Disaster OEP 


9,714.96 


-0- 


9,714.96 


HUD-Environmental Protection 


-0- 


6,460.00 
115,718.41 


6.460.00 




490,049.36 


605,767.77 


State Reimbursement: 








School Transportation 


122,233.73 


-0- 


122,233.73 


Outside School Transportation 


1,201.00 


648.00 


1,849.00 


Vocational Education 


5,805.00 


7,187.00 


12,992.00 


Food Service 


18,944.14 


9,071.90 


28,016.04 


Building Assistance 


162,597.51 


-0- 


162,597.51 


Education of Deaf & Blind 


168.00 


-0- 


168.00 


Tuition & Transportation 


17,471.22 


-0- 


17,471.22 


Conservation Land Purchase 


15,700.00 


-0- 


15,700.00 


Water Pollution Control 


3,370.00 


-0- 


3,370.00 


Water Pollution Control-PL 


12,011.20 


-0- 


12,011.20 


Highways Chapter 114, sec. 20 


50,844.00 


84,739.00 


135,583.00 


Library Aid 


4,031.25 


4,031.25 


8,062.50 


Marine Fisheries 


1,500.00 


-0- 


1,500.00 


Decennial Census Cost 


2,797.00 


-0- 


2,797.00 


Regional School District 


-0- 


80,688.00 


80,688.00 


Highway Fund Distribution 


-0- 


33,663.28 
220,028.43 


33,663.28 




418,674.05 


638,702.48 


County Reimbursement: 








Outside School Transportation 


1,138.16 


313.24 


1,451.40 


Dog Refund 


1,429.49 


1,163.04 


2,592.53 




2,567.65 


1.476.28 


4,043.93 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30. 1974 





January 1 


January 1 


Total 




to Dec. 31 


to June 30 




Grants & Gifts (cont. ) 




Other Gifts: 








Chamber of Commerce 


1,111.00 


-0- 


1,111.00 


Feoffees of Grammar School 


7,500.00 


-0- 


7,500.00 


Ipswich Fairways, Inc. 


10,000.00 


-0- 


10,000.00 


Ascension Memorial Church 


-0- 


200.00 
200.00 


200.00 




18,611.00 


18,811.00 


Special Assessments 








Sewer: 








Unapportioned 


17,273.32 


15,147.54 


32,420.86 


Apportioned Paid in Advance 


6,278.57 


1,388.60 


7,667.17 


Added to Taxes: 








Levy of 1972 


261.13 


47.25 


308.38 


Levy of 1973 


13,464.49 


.250.88 


13,715.37 




37.277.51 


16,834.27 


54,111.78 


Privileges 








Motor Vehicle Excise: 








Levy of 1966 


52.80 


-0- 


52.80 


Levy of 1967 


97.85 


-0- 


97.85 


Levy of 1969 


14.03 


132.00 


146.03 


Levy of 1970 


187.29 


221.10 


408.39 


Levy of 1971 


893.45 


59.40 


952.85 


Levy of 1972 


135,243.71 


2,252.09 


137.495.80 


Levy of 1973 


272,387.21 


66,636.64 


339,023.85 


Levy of 197 A 


-0- 


41,645.47 
110,946.70 


41,645.47 




408,876.34 


519,823.04 


Farm Animals: 








Levy of 197 3 


283.80 


-0- 


283.80 


Departmental 








General Government: 








Selectmen: 








Liquor ID 


120.00 


16.00 


136.00 


Accountant: 








Group Insurance 


-0- 


7,385.00 


7.385.00 


Processing Payroll 


-0- 


328.00 


328.00 


Casualty Insurance 


-0- 


16,300.00 


16,300.00 


Workmen's Compensation 


-0- 


9,182.00 


9,182.00 


County Retirement 


-0- 


51,952.00 


51,952.00 


Northern Essex Consortium 


1,729.34 


233.08 


1,962.42 


Treasurer: 








Costs - Taxes 


278.00 


346.00 


624.00 


Costs - Motor Vehicle Excise 


2,124.00 


690.00 


2,814.00 


Tax Certificates 


1,472.00 


596.00 


2,068.00 


Town Clerk: 








Recordings 


731.50 


312.50 


1,044.00 


Marriage Intentions 


330.00 


200.00 


530.00 


Certified Copies 


550.25 


259.00 


809.25 


All others 


325.50 


166.00 


491.50 


Planning Board: 








Subdivision Inspector 


32.00 


-0- 


32.00 


Rules & Regulations 


17.50 


4.50 


22.00 


Filing Fees 


30.00 


15.00 


45.00 


Board of Appeals: 








Hearing Fees 


432.00 


180.00 


612.00 



DFTAILFD STATED NT OF CASH RFCEIFTS 
For the Fiscal Year F.ndine June 30, 1974 



Departmental (cont. ) 
General Government: 
Historical Commission 
Conservation Commission 
Hearing Fees 

Public Safety: 
Po 1 i c e : 

Photocopies 

Bicycle Registration 

Firearms Identification 

Boarding Dogs 
Forestry: 

Line Clearing 
Sealer of Weights 

Health & Sanitation: 
Rabies Clinic 
Immunizations 
Housing Authority Contribution: 

Sewer Construction 
Sewer Rentals 
Sewer Rental Liens: 

Levy of 1972 

Levy of 1973 
Recycling 

Highways: 
Generals 

State - Chapter 90 
Sidewalks 
Machinery Rental 
Equipment Maintenance 

Veterans' Services: 

Reimbursement for Relief 
Recovery 

Schools: 

Adult Education Tuition 
Tuition from Municipalities 
Drivers' Education Fees 
Sale of Surplus Equipment 
Rent of- Facilities 
Cafeteria - Local 
Athletic Account 
Lost Textbooks 
Pay Telephone 

Recreation: 
Swim Program 
Beach Stickers 
Lighthouse Use 

Unclassified: 

Sale of Town Property 216.83 326.00 542.83 



January 1 
to Dec. 31 


January 1 
to June 30 

-0- 


Total 


7.00 


7.00 


125.00 


-0- 


125.00 


8,304.90 


88,165.08 


96,469.17 


437.00 


206.00 


643.00 


40.50 


64.50 


105.00 


202.00 


68.00 


270.00 


-0- 


46.00 


46.00 


4,523.60 


4,760.48 


9,284.08 


109.90 


13.00 


122.90 


5,^13.00 


5,157.98 


10,470.98 


378.00 


454.00 


832.00 


18.50 


-0- 


18.50 


45,000.00 


-0- 


45,000.00 


24,567.83 


13,090.01 


37.657.84 


257.61 


-0- 


257.61 


1,235.74 


43.45 


1,279.19 


642.67 


2,950.25 


3,592.92 


72,100.35 


16,537.71 


88,638.06 


1,450.46 


-0- 


1,450.46 


20.00 


-0- 


20.00 


25.00 


-0- 


25.00 


1,772.48 


151.29 


1,923.77 


3,267.94 


151.29 


3,419.23 


39,578.21 


25,596.67 


65,174.88 


184.00 


576.50 


760.50 


39,762.21 


26,173.17 


65,935.38 


-0- 


6,000.00 


6,000.00 


1,870.00 


560.00 


2,430.00 


900.00 


-0- 


900.00 


3,020.00 


-0- 


3,020.00 


15.00 


-0- 


15.00 


155,336.79 


71,941.80 


227,278.59 


10,289.93 


1,548.00 


11,837.93 


53.00 


-0- 


53.00 


208.44 


111.51 
80,161.31 


319.95 


171,693.16 


251,854.47 


463.00 


-0- 


463.00 


2,263.00 


-0- 


2,263.00 


507 . 50 


-0- 


507 . 50 


3,233.50 


-0- 


3,233.50 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 197 4 



January 1 
to Dee. 31 
Interest On (cont. ) 
Trust Funds: (cont. ) 

Electric Depreciation 1,299.29 

Conservation 1,884.93 

12,886.34 
Municipal Indebtedness 

Anticipation of Revenue 1,500,000.00 
Anticipation-Serial Issue: 

Electric Building 100,000.00 

Water 225,000.00 

Sewer Construction 160,000.00 

Serial Loans: 

Electric Building 175,000.00 

Sewer Extension 160,000.00 

Water Pumping Station 65,000.00 

Premium on Loans 565.15 

Accrued Interest 106.67 

2,385,671.82 

Agency, Trust & Investments 
Agency: 

Dog Licenses 2,489.25 

Sale of Dogs 54.00 

Meter Deposits 6,585.00 

Health Insurance Deductions 63,314.91 

Health Insurance Paid In 4,287.82 

Health Insurance Consortium 1,792.04 

OME Deductions 595.06 

OME Paid In 1,108.80 

Life Insurance Deductions 1,826.74 

Life Insurance Paid In 105.59 

Life Insurance Consortium 40.15 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 20,607.35 

Clothing Allowance Deductions 1,862.63 

Advances - Payroll 2,230.11 

Advances - Workmen's Compensation 112.00 

Revolving: Police 13,878.00 

Revolving: General 30.00 



120,919.45 
Trust: 

Perpetual Care Bequests 5,270.00 
Flower Fund Bequests 400.00 

Mrs. William G. Brown Reimbursement 3,654.31 
R. T. Crane Picnic Reimbursement 1,182.40 
Eunice Cowles Reimbursement 500.00 



Investments: 
Revenue Cash 
Non- Re venue 
Federal Revenue Sharing 

Refunds 

General Government 
Public Safety 
Health & Sanitation 
Highways 



11,006.71 

,000,000.00 

48,000.00 

869,719.00 

,917,719.00 



320.19 

549.14 

60.00 

276.52 



January 1 


Total 


to June 30 




3,138.48 


4,437.77 


2,145.53 


4,030.46 


19,257.13 


32,143.47 


-0- 


1,500,000.00 


-0- 


100,000.00 


-0- 


225,000.00 


-0- 


160,000.00 


-0- 


175,000.00 


-0- 


160,000.00 


-0- 


65,000.00 


-0- 


565.15 


-0- 


106.67 


-0- 


2,385,671.82 


1,704.60 


4,193.85 


138.00 


192.00 


4,015.00 


10,600.00 


34,365.62 


97,680.53 


2,096.28 


6,384.10 


228.13 


2,020.17 


444.46 


1,039.52 


623.04 


1,731.84 


953.50 


2,780.24 


52.43 


158.02 


4.95 


45.10 


10,531.16 


31,138.51 


901.06 


2,763.69 


420.84 


2,650.95 


216.00 


328.00 


8,893.00 


22,771.00 


-0- 


30.00 


65,588.07 


186,507.52 


2,360.00 


7,630.00 


1,340.00 


1,740.00 


-0- 


3,654.31 


-0- 


1,182.40 


-0- 


500.00 


3,700.00 


14,706.71 


3,050,000.00 


4,050,000.00 


257,000.00 


305,000.00 


550,000.00 


1,419,719.00 


3,857,000.00 


5,774,719.00 


125.80 


445.99 


513.52 


1,062.66 


-0- 


60.00 


25.00 


301.52 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1974 



January 1 
to Dec. 31 



January 1 
to June 30 



Total 



Departmental (cont.) 








Unclassified: (cont.) 








Rental of Town Property 


5,168.66 


3,595.35 


8,764.01 


Fire Loss Insurance 


21,996.00 


88.03 


22,084.03 


Other Insurance 


575.75 


476.53 


1,052.28 




27,957.24 


4,485.91 


32,443.15 


Public Service Enterprises 








Electric: 








Sale of Electricity 


1,391,407.92 


945,719.39 


2,337,127.31 


Aid to Construction 


720.66 


1,720.08 


2,440.74 


Office Expense-Reimbursement 


2,050.29 


12,773.46 


14,823.75 


Water: 








Sale of Water and Services 


186,333.87 


110,786.02 


297,119.89 


Liens: 








Levy of 1972 


1,589.28 


-0- 


1,589.28 


Levy of 1973 


10,375.72 


639.55 


11,015.27 




1,592,477.74 


1,071,638.50 


2,664,116.24 


Cemeteries 








Sale of Lots 


1,750.00 


1,225.00 


2,975.00 


Care of Lots 


565.50 


11,473.00 


12,038.50 


Openings 


5,340.00 


2,835.00 


8,175.00 


Foundations 


1,016.10 


40.00 


1,056.10 


Tents 


660.00 


300.00 


960.00 


Liners 


520.00 
9,851.60 


-0- 


520.00 




15,873.00 


25,724.60 


Interest On 








Meter Deposits 


3,098.62 


1,539.59 


4,638.21 


Tax Titles 


-0- 


789.95 


789.95 


Taxes and Assessments: 








Taxes 


6,479.81 


3,662.35 


10,142.16 


Sewer Assessments: 








Levy of 1972 


301.75 


5.67 


307.42 


Levy of 1973 


6,958.51 


148.89 


7,107.40 


Apportioned Paid in Advance 


82.10 


46.68 


128.78 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


1,099.84 


513.09 
6,706.22 


1,612.93 




18,020.63 


24,726.85 


Investment Funds: 








General 


10,417.50 


29,934.23 


40,351.73 


Revenue Sharing 


11,202.61 


4,197.53 


15,400.14 


Electric Temporary Loan 


1,371.34 


2,212.50 


3,583.84 


Water Temporary Loan 


4,050.75 


1,898.58 


5,949.33 


Stabilization 


12,011.95 


15,315.23 


27,327.18 



Trust Funds: 
Ma ri anna Jones 
R. T. Crane Picnic 
Eunice C. Cowles 
Mark Newman 
John C. Kimball 
Cemetery-Perpetual Care 
Cemetery-Flowers 
Mrs. William G. Brown 
Martha Savory 
Dow Boulder 
Appleton Memorial 



39,054.15 

125.94 

1,187.88 

671.10 

505.90 

25.18 

6,514.27 

354.05 

181.88 

51.61 

16.21 

68.10 



53,558.07 

140.95 
1,369.44 

339.29 

566.25 

31.79 

10,790.37 

483.42 
62.63 
64.53 
23.95 

100.50 



92,612.22 

266.89 

2,557.32 

1,010.39 

1,072.15 

56.97 

17,304.64 

837.47 

244.51 

116.14 

40.16 

168.60 



DETAILED STATE *£ NT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 197 A 

January 1 
to Dec. 31 



Refunds (cont. ) 

Veterans' Benefits 1,032.20 

Schools 2,522.91 

Libraries 246.35 

Recreation 664.62 

Retirement - Teachers 247.50 

Insurance 37,721.45 

Interest on Debt 487.50 

Interest Tax Anticipation 698.76 
Electric: 

Purchased Power 59,742.52 

Other 235.84 

Tax Title Foreclosure Expense 4.14 

Union 60.00 

Accrued Interest 106.67 

R. T. Crane 1.061.43 

106,037.74 

TOTAL RECEIPTS 12,768,873.19 



January 1 
to June 30 


Total 


281.77 


1,313.97 


2,140.53 


4,663.44 


-0- 


246.35 


-0- 


664.62 


103.86 


351.36 


469.34 


38,190.79 


-0- 


487.50 


-0- 


698.76 


-0- 


59,742.52 


509.97 


745.81 


-0- 


4.14 


-0- 


60.00 


-0- 


106.67 


-0- 


1,061.43 


4,169.79 


110,207.53 


8,098,666.40 


20,867,539.59 



Source: Town Accountant 



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FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 

IPSWICH, MASS. 01938 

WILLIAM F. HAYES HARRY E. MUNR0 

JEROME RICHARDSON DONALD F. WHISTON 

Financial Statement 1974 

Balance January 1, 1974 $ 1,546.78 

Cash received 1974 97,207.86 

98,754.64 
Expenditures 1974 95,438.57 

Balance December 31, 1974 3,316.07 

Little Neck (Land only) valued at $97,500.00 

Store Building 4,600.00 

Barn 1,090.00 

Wharf 1,019.00 

Cash in First Nat'l Bank Ipswich 3,316.07 

On deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 13,092.37 



Interest 593.93 

On deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 

Farm account 5,380.57 

Interest 289 . 34 

On deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 

Special Notice account 3,263.70 

Interest 192.68 

On deposit Ipswich Co-op. Bank 6,625.99 

Interest and Dividends 476.81 



13,686.30 
5,669.91 

3,456.38 
7,102.80 



Cost Value 

234 Sh. 1st Nat81 Bost. Corp; 2,74"8Tl8 5,762.25 

140 Sh. Shawm. Ass'n Corp. 2,748.63 3,535.00 

Ipswich Co-op Paid-up Cert. 2,000.00 2,000.00 ,, 2 g 7 2 c 

$148,737.71 
S7500.00 was donated to the Town for support of schools. 

The following taxes were paid to the Town of Ipswich: 

Land Assessed Value 97,500.00 $ 5,679.37 

Store " " 4,600.00 267.95 

Barn " " 1,090.00 63.50 

Wharf « " 1,019.00 59.35 

Cottages " " 1,089,540.00 63,465.70 

1,193,749.00 #69,535.87 



^yv^i^«'^- 




■Tj^asurer/Manager 



Feoffees of the Grammar School 



1974 Report 



Exhibit A 



Reconciliation of Cash Balance 



December 31, 1974 



Balance, January 1, 1974 
Gash Receipts, Schedule I 

Expenditures 1974 
Balance, December 31, 1974 



S 1,546.78 
97,207.86 

98,754,64 
95,438.57 

tt 3,316.07 



Outstanding Accounts 
December 31, 1974 



1971 

1972 

1973 
1974 



ft 809. 52 

849.51 

1,653.55 

5,500.56 

$8,813.14 



Feoffees of the Grammar School 1974 Report 

Schedule I 

Cash Receipts 
January 1 - December 31, 1974 



Collections; 

Rent and Land Charges $30,349.85 

Taxes 65,174.64 

Interest 49^,06 $96,017-55 

Dividends : 

First National Boston Corp. 394.29 

Shawmut Association, Inc. 420 ♦ 00 g lz , pq 

Miscellaneous payments: 376.02 

$97,207.86 



Feoffees of the Grammar School 1974 Report 

Schedule II 
Expenditures 
January 1 - December 51, 1974 



Taxes: 



Town of Ipswich $69,535.87 

Collector of Internal Revenue 99.4-5 ^50, 655.32 

Donations: 



Town of Ipswich School Department 7,500.00 

Repairs : 

Roads 1,770.34 

Ivharf 14-9.4-3 

Float 386.19 

Brush 117.50 

*'ence 27.00 

Community Building 154.98 2 605.4-4 

Playgrounds : 105.00 

Police : 

Town Officers 1,128.00 

Special police 900.00 

Telephone 130.68 

Salaries and Expenses : 

Salaries 1,94-7.35 

Transportation 600.00 

Meetings 77.75 

Rental, Safe Deposit Box 12.00 

Office Supplies 136.26 o 77* 36 

Insurance and Bond : 596.00 

Miscellaneous : 64.77 

Deposited in pavings Account: 10,000.00 

$95,438.57 



2,158.68 



BROWN SCHOOL FUND 



Treasurers Report 12th January 1975 



Balance 31st December 1973 3969.95 

Salem Five Cent Savings Bank 
Interest thru 31st December 1974 217*06 

Balance 31st December 1973 2836.38 

Ipswich Savings Bank 
Interest thru 3rd January 1975 152, 51 

Total Balance 31st December 1974 



J. Perry Smith 
Treasurer 



Certified 

Charlotte E. Terry 
12th January 1975 



4187.01 



2988.8Q 
7175.90 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 



BALANCE SHEET 



JUNE 30, 1974. 



ASSETS 

Current Asset* x 
Cash: 
Plant Art. 23, ATM 1973 
Depreciation 
Construction 
Plant-Art. 10, ATM 1969 
Surplus 
Special Deposits 

Accounts Receivable 
Working Funds 
Inventory: 

Fuel Oil 

Lubricants 

Materials & Supplies 

Total Current Assets 

Fixed Assets; 
Land & Land Rights 
Power Structures 
Fuel holders 
Prime Movers 
Generators 

Accessory Elec. Equip. 
Misc. Power Equip. 
Land & Land Rights 
Land Clearing 
Trans. -Poles & Fixtures 
Trans .-Overhead 'Conductors 
Distrib.-Sta. Equip. 
Poles & Fixtures 
Overhead Conductors 
Underground Conduits 
Underground Conductors 
Line Trans. & Regulator 
Services 
Meters 

Meter Installations 
Street Lighting 
Outdoor Private Lighting 
General Structures 
Equipment : 

Office 

Transportation 

Shop 

Laboratory 

Communication 
Total Fixed Assets 
Less Reserve for Deprec. 



LIABILITIES & SURPLUS 



32,799.22 

85,783.23 

39,597.24 

237. 04 

81,832.30 

10.260.00 

250,509.03 

10A, 660.78 

375.00 

-0- 

-0- 
60.197,9'? 
60,197,9'? 
425,742.76 



841.20 

115,366.15 

9,336.48 

1,115,411.68 

35,766.78 

93.570.81 

16,379.35 

17,706.60 

4,428.00 

42,584.49 

26,691.33 

705,396.01 

288,207.09 

343,819.81 

57,217.49 

91,829.35 

340,096.25 

53,791.04 

130,244.39 

1,291.48 

96,438.75 

5,094.03 

227,794.61 

25,894.49 

153.^9.96 

11,079.09 

4,477.84 

6.437.86 

4,020,642.41 

1.644.364.73 

2,376,277.68 



Liabilities; 
Bonds Payable 
Customers 1 Deposits 
Interest Accrued 



399,000.00 

10,260.00 

4.712.33 

413,972.33 



Surplus: 

Loans Repayment 841,000.00 

Construction Contrib. 13,419.00 

Unappropriated 1 , 533 , 629 .H 

Earned Surplus _____________«. 

2,388,048.11 



Total Assets 



2,802,020,44 Total Liab. & Sur. 2.802.020.44 



Expenses; 
Generating: 
Operation, Supervision 
and Engineering 
Fuel 

Generation Expense: 
Labor 
Lubricants 
Maintenance : 
Supervision & Engineering 
Structures - Power 
Generator & Elec. Equip. 
Misc. Other Expenses 

Other Power Supply: 
Purchased Power 

Distribution : 
Overhead Trans. Lines 
Overhead Lines Exp, 
Underground Lines Exp. 
Meter Expenses 
Maintenance : 

Supervision & Engineering 

Dist. Station Equip. 

Overhead Lines 

Underground Lines 

Street Lighting 
Misc. Expenses 



Customers Accounts Receivable: 
Supervision 
Meter Reading 
Records & Collections 



Administrative & General: 
Salaries 

Office Supplies & Expense 
Outside Services 
Property Insurance: 
General 
Power 
Injuries & Damages: 
General 
Power 
Employees Pensions 
Maint. General Plant 
Transportation 
Depreciation 
Interest on Bonds 
Misc. General Expense 
Interest Refunds 

Total Expenses 
Net Profit 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
For the Year Ending June 30, 1974 

Sales: 





Residential 


1,143,121.08 




Home Heating 


121,304.98 


20,683.64 


Apartment Heating 


86,015.84 


342,120.48 


Commercial 


338,403.92 




Industrial 


306,006.21 


142,764.67 


Commercial Heating 


.2,925.45 


16,909.58 


Street Lighting 


27,300.00 




Municipal Buildings 


66,818.41 


16,605.32 


Private Area Lighting 


6,598.00 


3.598.04 


Sales for Resale 


322,983.26 


25.854.73 


Misc. Service Rev. 


300.00 


7.769.13 


Other Electric Rev. 


13.783.34 


576,305.59 




2.435,360.49 




Less Disc. & Abate. 


124.812.97 


965,982.98 


Net Sales 
Other Income: 


2,310,547.52 


-0- 


Interest: 




74.27 


On Depreciation Fund 


3,552.60 


47.20 


On Special Deposits 


4.638.21 


16,947.58 


Total Other Income 


8,190.81 


16,414.04 






3,736.43 






145,653.19 






5,513.19 






8,099.70 






14.448.26 






210,933.86 






6,413.21 






11,907.50 






44.519.78 






62,840.49 






41,395.44 






4,722.51 






8,373.84 






4,015.00 






10,000.00 






4,250.00 






3,500.00 






49,520.00 






2,015.19 






16,200.57 






169,879.62 






27,399.62 






8,010.71 






640.88 






349,923.38 






2,165,986.30 






152. 7^2. 03 






2. 318.738. "*3 




2.^18.738.^3 



WATER DEPARTMENT 





BALANCE 


SHEET 






JUNE 30, 


197^ 




ASSETS 




LIABILITIES AND 


SURPLUS 


Current Assets: 




Liabilities : 




Cash: 




Bonds Payable 


305,000.00 


Surplus 


15,557.85 


Surplus: 




Operations-Encumbered 1973 


60.00 


Profit or Loss 


(79,485.27) 


Plant Investment-1973 


37.19 


Town Contribution 


W.6,505.58 


Construction 


38,295.95 


Campanelli Cont. 


46,000.00 


Dow's Brook Reservoir 


516.69 


APW Mass. 71-G Cont. 


179,544.52 


Water' Main Construction 


430.71 


Property Account 


981,308.27 




5^.898.39 


Electric Contribution 


39.338.91 



1,583,212.01 



Accounts Receivable: 
Rates & Services 
Added to Taxes 



Material & Supplies 
Total Current Assets 

Fixed Assets: 
Engineering 
Land 

New Well System 
Pumping Station 
Reservoirs & Standpipes 
Storage Basins 
Dist. Reservoirs 
Departmental Buildings 
Store House 
Pumps & Pumping Equip. 
Purification System 
Pipe Lines & Dist. Mains 
Service Pipes 
Meters 

Consumers Meters Installed 
Hydrants 

Misc. Expenditures 
Office Equipment 
Shop Equipment 
Stores Equipment 
Trans. Equipment 
Misc. Equipment 

Less Reserve for Deprec. 



33.583.77 

1.768.17 

35.351.94 

30.775.88 
121,026.21 



49,493.77 

20,249.72 

129,004.72 

65,555.3* 

436,627.27 

27,693.59 

135,979.62 

5,887.57 

5,137.25 

69,985.05 

8,198.26 

1,381,061.35 

225,573.99 

90,194.12 

1.750.40 

40,362.63 

1,912.10 

6,865.80 

8,512.07 

68.26 

i+3,517.20 

1 5.194,3 5 

2,768,824.45 
1.001.638.65 
1,767.185.80 



Total Assets: 



1.888.212.01 



1.888.212.01 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
For the Year Ending June 30, 197** 



EXPENSES: 




Operating : 




Maintenance : 




Supply Structures 


81.0? 


Reservoirs 


292.94 


Pumping Station Supplies 


348.25 


Pumping Building 


207.63 


Pumping Equipment 


7,079.47 


Inspection of Meters 


-0- 


Mains 


8,592.18 


Standpipes 


-0- 


Services 


16,202.29 


Meters 


7,361.06 


Hydrants 


10,936.76 


Electricity Purchased 


17,040.10 


Purification Supplies 




and Expenses 


13,558.00 


General Labor 


19.307.20 




101,006.95 


Administrative : 




General Office Salaries 


39.721.16 


General Office Supplies 




and Expenses 


4,511.64 


Insurance 


4,232.00 


Transportation 


9,546.82 


Maintenance: 




General Structures 


385.77 


Depreciation 


9^,268.57 


Pensions 


9,817.00 


Interest on Bonds 


17,069.70 


Misc. General Expenses 


589,87 




180,142.53 


Total Expenses: 


281,149.48 


Profit or (Loss) 


28.282.39 




309.431.87 



SALES: 

Metered 306,402.06 

Flat Rate 10,222.50 

Sale of Supplies 5,157.25 
Rent from Water Meters2,320.00 
Tap-in Charges 825.00 
Application Charges 4,400.00 
Misc. Non-Operating 
Income S. 146. 10 

Total Sales 33^.^72.91 



Less Discounts 
Abatements 



24,615.90 
425.14 



309.431.87 



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The Commission is including in its budget for the coming year a request fore 
small appropriation, in the expectation of receiving a similar amount in matching 
funds, for the purpose of doing some much-needed preservation work on many of 
the Town's historic documents. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Armand Brouillette, Chief 

The Police Department has been increased by one man this past year. We now 
have a compliment of 19 full-time sworn officers. We have been somewhat ham- 
pered with the loss of two men due to extended illnesses. 

During the past year the Department has been studied by two separate 
agencies. The National Clearinghouse for Criminal Justice Planning and Ar- 
chitecture from the University of Illinois has written a report which was received 
in October. This report points out some of the shortcomings in the physical plant, 
the actual police headquarters. They suggest some extensive remodeling or a new 
location designed for police-community relations and increased efficiency in the 
police function. 

The second agency, the Massachusetts Police Institute, conducted an ex- 
tensive man power survey. They have written a comprehensive report and 
recommend the addition of patrolmen and a lieutenant to the force. They have also 
made other recommendations and suggestions for a more efficient operation of the 
department. 

Both of these reports were paid for by LEAA funds. The manpower survey is 
estimated to cost in the vicinity of $8000. These reports are at the disposal of Town 
Officials. 

The Department continues to serve the community in any police related 
matter. In this endeavor we have answered over 9000 calls for service. This 
represents an increase of 1000 over last year. A partial breakdown of service is 
shown in the chart below. 



Breaking and Entering 
Larcenies 

Motor Vehicles Stolen 
Armed Robbery 
Sudden Deaths 

Malicious Damage to Property 
Assaults 

Businesses Found Open 
Accidents Town Roads 
Persons Injured (Town Roads) 
Accidents State Roads 
Persons Injured (State Roads) 
Warrants Served 
Summons Served 
( + with 26 attempts) 



41 



973 


1974 


130 


+ 141 


294 


375 


44 


40 





2 


14 


9 


455 


490 


105 


165 


578 


425 


419 


437 


85 


50 


108 


95 


53 


35 




61 




587 



We anticipate that 1975 will show another increase in crimes against the 
property. This trend is already evident and is predictable due to the economic 
recession we seem to find ourself experiencing. 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

John Harrigan, Director 

The activities of the Ipswich Civil Defense Agency was kept to a Standby 
Reserve situation. The Agency stands ready, willing and able to handle most 
emergency type request, proud of the fact it can serve the townspeople when called 
to do so. 

I would like to use the space alloted to CD in the Town Report to recognize 
many citizens of Ipswich who donated their time and wisdom to CD which makes it 
a smooth working organization. Listed below are the roster of names who willingly 
gave their time and effort, a roster that I as Civil Defense Director am very proud 
and gratefully thank. 



Communications Group 
Leon Dorr V 

Ronald Beauregard 
James McCormack V 
DavidSavage 
Angelo Johnson 
George Lewis 
Kenneth Nokes 
Robert Jackson 
Alice Motley 
Kimball Harris 
Thomas Griffin 



y 



s 



Auxiliary Police 
Capt. Rudolph Provost b/ ' 
Lt. David Clements ^ 
Lt. Charles Beaupre 
Sgt. Charles Dodge 
Sgt. Burt Stackhouse 
Sgt. Stanley Trocki 
Sgt. Robie Wile 
Greg Logan 
Robert Chambers *"" 
Parker Atkinson 
John Kenney 
John Clogston ^ 
Lawrence Harvey */ 
John Harrigan 
Jose Pino 
George Desrocher 
Robert McLeod 
Frank Poltack 
Bruce Klinger 
James Zabelski "" 
Ernest Corbin vy 
Michael Singer 
Frank Gajewski Jr. 
Horace Baldwin 



y 



Auxiliary Fire Dept. 
Edward Francis q 
Stanley Colburn c 
Kenneth Fowler ~ 
David Bowen ^ 
Robert Cram ~ 
John Hansbury - 
Jeffery Hardy c 
Thomas Hills o 
Robert Mortenson - 
TedParady - 
Norman Stone Jr. c. 
Robert Stone £ 
Ernest Wright - 
Ralph Desilva ^ 
Phillip Collins 



AUXILIARY POLICE 

Rudolph Provost, Captain 

Throughout 1974 the Auxiliary Police Department continued to serve the Ips- 
wich community through the various volunteer services that it provides in 
augmenting regular Police Department functions. The following is a summarized 
report of the Department's activities: 



42 



— Monthly Meetings on the first Wednesday of each month. 

— Cruiser Patrol: 

Winter Patrol from January to March 

Spring Patrol from April to May 

Summer Patrol from June to August 

Fall Patrol from September to December 
These patrols consist of two men per night from 7:00 p.m. to Midnight. The Fall, 
Winter, and Spring Pa trols work two nights per week, Friday and Saturday, while 
the Summer Patrol works three nights a week, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. 

— Traffic Patrol for the Bike-A-Thon. Sunday, April 28, 1974. 

— Traffic Patrol for Olde Ipswich Days. From Tuesday, August 6, 1974 to 
Saturday, August 10, 1974. 

— Substituted for the Regular Police on Sunday, August 25, 1974, during the Ips- 
wich Policemen's Summer Picnic. 

— Traffic Patrol for the Ipswich Convention Parade on Sunday, September 22, 
1974. 

— Halloween Night Patro's on the evenings of Wednesday, October 30, 1974, and 
Thursday, October 31, 1974 Coverage of all schools. 

— Substitution of the Regular Police during the Annual Policemen's Ball on 
Saturday, November 30, 1974. 

Further activities of the Auxiliary Police include the November 6, 1974 Fund 
Raising Raffle to help pay for the new summer duty uniforms. Currently, the 
Department's membership is engaged in an intensive hand weapon training 
course. 

The Auxiliary Police Department is composed of 25 members: 1 captain, 2 
lieutenants, 3 sergeants, and 18 patrolmen. The Regular Police Department 
maintains a Liaison Officer, Jack Poirier, who conducts training classes upon 
various aspects of policework, and who maintains communication between the two 
Departments. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Theodore F. Mozdziez, Chief 

The following is a brief summary of the Fire Department activities for the 
current year. 

Bell Alarms 110 

Still Alarms 315 

• Complaints investigated 98 

Blasting Permits Issued 
Oil Burner Permits Issued 
Oil Burner Inspections made 
Oil Tank Permits Issued 
Oil Tank Inspections made 
Hospital and Nursing Home Inspections 
Day Care Inspections and Fire Drills 
Public School Fire Drills 

There has been an increase in fires with increased town growth. Percent 

1973 1974 Increase 

Bell Alarms - 101 Bell Alarms - 110 10 

Still Alarms -264 Still Alarms - 315 19 

43 



Fire Loss Report: 



Assessed value of p 


>roperty by fire 


693,443.50 


Insurance Carried 


on Property 


1,549,017.50 


Insurance Paid 




368,845.11 


A summary of the more serious fires indicate the following response 


for: 


Bomb Reports 




3 


Car Fires 




32 


Building Fires 




28 


Gasoline & Gas 




45 


Oil Burners 




8 


Grass & Woods 




62 


Resusitator 




6 


Search & Rescue 




5 



There is a serious need for replacement of a 31-year-old forestry truck and 
needed tanker trucks for forestry fires. The rapid growth in the outer Linebrook 
Road area necessitates the need for a manned sub-fire station in that area. 




Familiar silhouette on the Ipswich clam flats. 



(Ipswich Chronicle) 



SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Richard Sheppard 

Two separate closings of the shellfish areas were necessary in 1974 because of 
P.S.P. (so-called "Red Tide"), and during these P.S.P. emergencies, two days a 
week were consumed in the taking of shellfish samples for testing in the State 
Laboratory. 

Extra patrol work of the clamming areas had to be done to make sure no one 
was taking shellfish illegally. The Deputies assisting me were Anthony Thanos, 
Charles Gianakakis, and Stephen Kent. 

44 



We have removed many predators from the clam flats, including horseshoe, 
crabs, cockles, green crabs, and mussels. Also, many of the grass clumps growing 
on some of the flats have been removed and much more work needs to be done. 

Clam growth has been good. We have had an increase in the number of permits 
issued this year, making an extra amount of patrol work very necessary by my 
Deputies and me. 

Permits issued for 1974: 

Commercial 245 at $20.00 

Non-Commercial: Resident Yearly 757 at $ 2.50 

Non-Commercial: Non-Resident Yearly 341 at $15.00 

Non-Commercial: Non-Resident Daily 273 at $ 2.50 

HARBOR MASTER 

Pete S. Georgakopoulos 

The year 1974 was a tragic year for the Town of Ipswich. One life was lost when 
a boat capsized in our treacherous surf. Two men were rescued from the same 
incident. 

All areas were patrolled by Deputies Fred Janvrin, Al Hurd and Arthur 
Kapsalis. These men are non-paying volunteers. 

On several occasions, the Registry of Marine Recreational Vehicles sent its 
representatives to assist in patrolling the area. 

Several citations were issued by us to violators, and were prosecuted in Court. 

Two Court hearings on mooring violations were prosecuted by me. 

The Ipswich River and Eagle Hill were marked with trees and plastic jugs. 

With the cooperation of the Public Works and Electric Light Departments, our 
floats and ramp were put in the water and later hauled out for the season. 

Nine flashing blue lights were donated by the Ipswich Outboard Club. 

I conducted three classes in basic navigation. 

The following items were added to my inventory-: A two-way Walkie Talkie. 
Life Rings. Lif ejackets and Hand Lanterns. 

A by-law was passed which prohibits outboards of over five horsepower and 
over five miles per hour above the Sylvania dam. 

The tragedy of one lost life should be an example to the Town showing the need 
of a full-time Harbormaster with a seaworthy boat and motor. 




45 



SHELLFISH ADVISORY COMMISSION 

Thomas Dorman, Chairman 

Two separate outbreaks of P.S.P. were the dominating factors in the Ipswich 
shellfishing industry during 1974. The entire month of June and the greater part of 
September and October were lost to local clammers when P.S.P. levels increased 
above the 80 ppm level. The late May outbreak was very limited with most areas 
rising in P.S.P. levels to the 100 to 200 range, only slightly above the 800 ppm cut-off 
level. All areas were again reopened during the first week of July. The late August 
outbreak was more severe, but again like the May outbreak, the residual left in the 
clams decreased quickly allowing openings during mid-October. A total of 13 
weeks was lost by commercial and non-commercial clammers. The Shellfish 
Advisory Board, the Clam Constable, Representative David Lane and Town 
Manager Leonard Silvia were all involved in assisting the Department of Public 
Health in recognizing the economic need for cooperation in our shellfishing in- 
dustry and expediting the opening of local areas which showed "safe" levels. 
There were no cases of illness in Massachusetts as a result of either P.S.P. out- 
break in 1974. 

In July, Governor Sargeant signed Senate Bill 1744, Chapter 571 of the General 
Laws, which institutes a self-help program for the cities and towns which have and 
utilize a shellfish resource. The bill will provide 50 percent reimbursement of 
monies spent by Ipswich within its Shellfish Department. The purpose of the bill is 
to stimulate towns like Ipswich to improve its shellfish management programs and 
provide for more law enforcement. 

Water quality and factors related to pollution have been under study by Dr. 
John Zarahdnick and the University of Mass. Aquacultural and Marine 
Laboratory at Wareham. The Advisory Board and the town contracted Dr. Zarah- 
dnick and the University to perform extensive testing of the Ipswich River from 
July through December of this year. Factors such as" temperature, salinity, BOD, 
turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and coliform counts have been studied following 
controlled sampling of seven key stations in the Ipswich River for six consecutive 
months. The town will receive a written report in January which will contain all 
the data and accompanying information. We expect to continue this type of 
research in the future so that the town will at all times have up-to-date facts and 
information concerning its natural resources. 

During February, commission members attended a Shellfish Workshop in 
West Bridgewater where constables, management directors, resource officers and 
aquicultural experts from Massachusetts and Maine discussed methods for 
predator control, surveying flats, and sampling techniques. The day-long work- 
shop was sponsored by Project Dominion, a non-profit corporation pioneering in 
the improvement of local resources and the application of improved techniques. 

The Shellfish Advisory Commission meets the third Wednesday of each month 
at 8 p.m. at the Town Hall. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Edwin N. Bronk, Agent 

There were 93 plumbing permits and 75 gas permits issued in 1974. 

46 



Clinics held in 1974: 

Well child clinic is a continuing service of the Board of Health and is held on 
the first Monday of each month at the Winthrop School between the hours of 3:00 
and 4 .00 p.m. The clinic is operated for pre-school children only, who are examined 
for any medical and physical defects and the administering of immunizations, for 
which no fee is charged. 

The rabies clinic was conducted in May, and 227 dogs and cats were im- 
munized and a total of $454.00 was turned into the Town treasury. 

An influenza clinic was held in October, with more than 100 persons par- 
ticipating. 

A total of 83 percolation and ground water tests were conducted during the 
period of March 1 and May 31, 1974, of this a total of 62 sites were approved for 
construction of installation of septic systems, and 21 were disapproved as not 
meeting the standards of article XI of the State Sanitary Code. 

104 Burial permits were issued by the Board of Health, and permits were 
issued for oleo, milk, restaurant, ice cream manufacturing, etc. In addition, more 
than 1000 landfill stickers were issued for residents for their private vehicles, 
authorizing their admittance to the Town dump area. 

The annual spring and fall clean up was conducted for the pick up of large 
trash items, that are not picked up during the regular trash collection. 

The recycle center located at the Town garage area on County Road 
operated for a 12-month period showing a net profit of $600.00, in addition to a 
savings of $10.00 per ton for each ton of paper, cans and bottles that were not 
placed in the Town dump site. 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

Frank Story, Director 

Massachusetts Veterans' Benefits 

The Veterans' Benefits program assists and advises veterans and their 
dependents in obtaining benefits for which they have entitlement. The program 
deals with hardships resulting from disaster, illness, unemployment and strikes. It 
is difficult to estimate with accuracy the expenditure under this program. The 
number of veterans and their dependents receiving assistance in the Town of Ips- 
wich under Chapter 115 of the General Laws, as amended, is being reported by the 
number of cases processed monthly, as follows: January - 77, February - 73, March 
- 85, April - 67, May - 63, June - 65, July - 26, August - 48, September - 57, October - 46, 
November- 58, December- 53. A total of 718 cases were processed this year. There 
were 28 applications filed for the Massachusetts Vietnam Bonus. Exclusive of the 
bonus, 50 percent of the cost of the Benefits program is reimbursed by the State. 
Expenditures are listed in the financial statement of the Town Report. 

Veterans' Services — Federal 

The Veterans' Services Department assists and advises veterans and their 
dependents relative to obtaining Federal Benefits for which they have entitlement 
from Veterans Administration. In 1974 the following Federal services were ren- 

47 



dered by this office: Review of Separation Documents - 7, Headstone Applications - 
5, Change of Address forms - 21, Request to Release Information from Claimant's 
Folder - 12, VA Dental Claims - 14, Applications for Medical Benefits - 10, Com- 
pensation and Pension Claims - 26, Widow's Pension Claims - 9, Request for Ap- 
proval of School Attendance - 16, Marital Status Declarations - 2, Examinations for 
Housebound Status - 3, Statements of Income and Net Worth - 33, Statements in 
Support of Claim - 39, Enrollment Certifications - 2, Applications for Education - 9, 
Requests for Change of Program - 12, Power of Attorney forms - 56, Certificates of 
Eligibility - 22, Records of Service from Adjutant General's Office - 27, Annual 
Income Questionnaire Cards - 73, Applications for Champva - 3, Applications for 
Commissary Cards - 4, Requests for Real Estate Abatements - 14, Returned 
Treasury checks- 10, Rx filed with VA Outpatient Clinic - 11, Appointments for VA 
Outpatient Examinations - 5, Applications for Social Security Disability - 6, 
Requests for Military Records from St. Louis - 21, Claim for Disability Insurance 
Benefits - 2, Claim for Life Insurance - 8, Designation of Beneficiary and Optional 
Settlement - 5, Applications for Insurance Loans - 8. 

Compensations and pensions obtained for Ipswich veterans totaled $345,612.00 
for the year. Hospitalizations in VA facilities saved the Town of Ipswich $58,000.00. 
Educational benefits being received by "veterans and their dependents total 
$20,000.00. By transfers to the Social Supplemental Income program and Medicaid, 
the Town of Ipswich saved $42,468.00 and $65,000.00, respectively. The above 
categories represent a total saving of $531,080.00 to the Town in 1974. For Federal 
money received, there is no participation from the State or Town. 




NEW ELECTRIC LIGHT BUILDING, High Street 
Construction was completed in 1974. 



(Ipswich Chronicle) 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 

Alfred Tobiasz, Manager 

Construction of the new Electric Light Department building on High Street 
was completed in December and the Elm Street building was vacated and turned 
over to Town Officials for use by other departments. 

New office address: 222 High Street, Office hours 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Tel. 
356-4331, 4332. Emergency calls nights, Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays call 
Power Plant 6-3600. 



48 



MAJOR CONSTRUCTION PROPOSED 

1. Extend new 25 KV spacer cable from High Street at Mitchell Road to new sewer 

treatment plant Fowlers Lane. 

2. Complete underground cable installation to "Herrick Acres" off Newbury 

Road. 

3. Replace cable along Estes Street, Kimball Street, Peatfieid Street, First Street, 

Second Street, Fourth Street, and Fifth Street. 



CONSTRUCTION COMPLETED 

1. Cable and pole relocation on Linebrook Road due to Chapter 90 road con- 

struction. 

2. 13,800 volt spacer cable circuit from power station to Rowley line on High Street. 

3. 13,800 volt spacer cable was completed from Plains Road to Newbury Road. 

4. 26 Street lighting fixtures, 18 overhead services and 15 underground services, 2 

poles, 21,777' of overhead wire and 8,221' of underground cables and 1,590 KVA 
of transformers were added to the system. 



MAINTENANCE 

33 overhead and 7 underground service, 15 poles and 45 street lighting fixtures 
replaced. 

Maintenance at the General Station was carried out by personnel and all units 
are in good operating condition. The annual peak KW demand was 11,900 KW on 
December 26, 1974 which represents a decrease of 2,85 percent over last year. 



KW Peak Demand Meters in Service 

3490 3168 

5545 3598 

6820 3916 

10400 4230 

11900 4701 



POWER GENERATED & PURCHASED 

1972 1973 1974 

Generated 28,047,280 25,452,920 19,969,280 

Purchased 28,003,200 33,233,684 38,493,595 

Total KWH 56,050,480 58,686,604 58,462,875 

(This represents a decrease of 0.4 percent) 



49 







STATISTICS 




Aver. 


KWH used by 


Year 


Residential Customers KW 


1954 




2163 


1959 




2495 


1964 




3078 


1969 




4523 


1974 




5949 



RECREATION - PARK DEPARTMENT 

James H. Daly, Director 

Playground attendance at the nine staffed areas in all sections of Town 
remained stable this past summer (1974). Average daily attendance at the larger, 
better equipped areas such as Linebrook, Howe Park, Great Neck and Shatswell 
was 50 youngsters. Smaller numbers (30-40) took advantage of supervised 
programs at Burley, Giles Firmin, Skeet Field, Father Rye and Casali's. At- 
tendance at the Casali location in outer Linebrook was hampered by construction 
work in the area and the temporary loss of the ball field. Conditions there, 
however, will be improved with the planned relocation of the playground equip- 
ment and rejuvenation of the ball field both of which have met with the approval of 
new owner Bill Rust. 

An average of 40 youngsters per day attended the new Burley Playground 
behind the school that was equipped by the School Department and supervised by 
the Recreation Department. No new playgrounds are planned for the coming 
summer season; however, cooperation with neighborhood groups on the loan of 
certain portable equipment will continue to be the policy of the department. 

About 600 Ipswich youngsters participated in the annual Swim Instruction 
program that was carried out at the Don Bosco pool off County Road. Taught were 
basic swimming skills through Senior Life Saving over a ten- week period that 
included six weeks of double sessions (morning and evening). Red Cross qualified 
instructors were Supervisor Ruth Norwood, Pam Carter, Paula Jean and Jill 
Sears. Terry Navarro served as lifeguard. David Welsh served as bus driver. The 
School Department bus was again made available for the program at no cost ex- 
cept fuel and normal maintenance. Paper work, schedules, etc., were efficiently 
handled by Barbara Robishaw. Present plans call for the continuation of the 
successful program at the same locale. 

The annual Winter program included basketball and volleyball for all age 
groups at three locations. Skating on the natural ponds under the jurisdiction of the 
Recreation Department was touch and go as usual because of the mild tem- 
peratures and storms. A new area at the Historical property off South Main Street 
was maintained by the Park Department as was Baker's Pond within Daniel 
Boone Park and the man-made rink at Linebrook Playground. 

Other programs included self-supporting ballroom Dance classes held 
throughout the winter in the Memorial Building, a ten-month program for Special 
Children on Saturdays and Wednesday afternoons, Tennis instructions for all age 
groups, the annual February School Vacation program and others. Constant at- 
tention and help is given to the Golden Age Club. 

Park Department 

The Park Department crew of three men continued their maintenance of 13 
ball fields, 9 playgrounds, the North Green South Common, all the lawns of the 
Light Department including the spacious areas at the Power Plant, sub-stations, 
etc.; Highway lawns, Water Department lawns, etc. Crew also maintained ex- 
tensive playground equipment and effected various improvements on ball fields 
located on School property but used extensively for Recreation Department 
programs. At last count there were 53 organized teams operating in Ipswich in- 
cluding Little League, Softball Leagues and Baseball teams. The number is ex- 
pected to increase in 1975 as more people turn to outdoor recreation. 

50 



The department also maintains those areas on private property that are 
utilized by the Recreation Department such as the tennis courts at Don Bosco and 
Notre Dame, and four ball fields at LaSalette and Don Bosco. During the winter the 
Park crew construct picnic tables and benches, redecorate and repair playground 
portable equipment, maintain the Memorial Building and service the outdoor 
skating areas. The department truck is used for snow plowing and other menial 
chores upon request by other departments. 

Memorial Building. 

Under the care of the Rec-Park Department this building is being used by Ips- 
wich Youth Hockey, Little League, Brownie Scouts, Sea Scouts (co-ed), GALS 
Softball, Twi and Weekend Softball groups, Girl Scouts, Army and Marine 
Recruiters, Bicentennial Committee, Special Childrens program, American 
Legion & Auxiliary, Amvets & Auxiliary, School Guidance Department, various 
Recreation programs and others. The Recreation Department Office is also 
located in the building. 



LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian 

In a landmark move begun over 18 months ago, the Board of Library Trustees 
completed all necessary legal requirements to transfer title, assets and holdings of 
the Library to the Town of Ipswich, thus ending the private trusteeship of 106 
years' standing. 

A simple ceremony on July 1 marked the official transfer, as Board Chairman 
Phyllis Bruce presented the Deed, Bill of Sale and Vote of the Trustees to Select- 
men Chairman Joseph Navarro. 

The new Board of Trustees, enlarged from five to nine members, was named 
by the Board of Selectmen to carry out the policy-making functions of the Library, 
kew Board members and their terms are as follows: Three years — Reverend 
Robert F. Dobson. William E. Waitt, Jr. and Mrs. Louise W. Sweetser; two years 

— Mrs. Phyllis E. Bruce, Mrs. Kathryn G. Klinger and Mrs. Ann Durey ; one year 

— Judge Thomas A. Johnson, Daniel W. Poor, Jr. and Mrs. Alice Keenan. 

Discussions have continued on plans for the proposed expansion to the hun- 
dred-year-old facility. 

Service to the community is at a high level. We suggest you consult the graphic 
material below. Over 7,000 residents are registered borrowers; circulation of all 
library materials for 1974 totalled 133,483. The Eastern Massachusetts Regional 
Library System enables us to supply patrons with books from other libraries via 
daily truck delivery service; 125 films were borrowed from the Boston Public 
Library. 

The Friends of the Library continue to render invaluable service through their 
volunteer program, in addition to their bringing to the community a wide range of 
special programs covering sports, music and travel. Ongoing "outreach" projects 
include service to shut-ins, and special story-telling sessions for school children. 

Let your public library have the opportunity to serve you. Call on us for your 
informational, recreational and educational reading needs. 



51 













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52 



COMBINED BOOK CIRCULATION 



1973 vs. 1974 



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Note: Figures exclude recordings, reference materials, and teachers' collections. 




HOUSING AUTHORITY (House ofHinlin) 

(l-r) John Thatcher, Jr. — Jane Bokron, Executive Director — Arthur 
Weagle, Chairman — Stanley Eustace — Loretta Dietch — Harold 
Bowen. 



53 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Jane Bokron - Executive Director - Secretary 
Arthur Weagle, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority currently administers four, (4) projects, 
namely: 200-1 (24-Southern Heights), 667-C (20-Southern Manor and 42 Caroline 
Avenue) , 667-3 ( 58-Caroline Avenue) , 707 (65-Rent Subsidy Scattered Housing) . 

NEW PROJECTS APPROVED: The original plans for 84 Low Income 

Elderly Units (667-4) and 24 Low Income Family Units (705-1) were rejected by the 
Ipswich Zoning Board of Appeals. New plans were then reduced and changed to 
include 80 Elderly Units and 14 Family Units. These new plans were subsequently 
approved by The Ipswich Zoning Board of Appeals. At this writing, The Ipswich 
Housing Authority is awaiting word from the Department of Community Affairs of 
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts as to when funds will be available. 

200-1 PROJECT -LOW INCOME FAMILY: These 24 Low Income Family 

Units were built in 1950. Each unit has its own gas furnace, gas stove and gas hot 
water tank. The average shelter rent is $70.00 per month. Much has been done to 
improve this project. The Sewer Tie-In to the Municipal Sewer System, which was 
started in August 1974 was completed and in operation in July 1974. We wish to take 
this opportunity to thank Kevin McElhinney, his abled staff and ABC Mullholland 
for a job well done. At the completion of the sewer tie-in, all lawns in that area were 
reseeded. "Ye Shelter", children bus stop, complete with a cupola and weather 
vane was built and dedicated September 5, 1974. All 24 apartments now have a 
bathroom shower. New fluorescent ceiling fixtures were installed and new inlaid 
kitchen floors were installed in some apartments. Many apartments were com- 
pletely painted in one neutral shade, thereby a great savings in paint and labor. 
Each apartment has its own fire extinguisher. All heater ducts were industrially 
cleaned. All hedges, shrubs and trees were trimmed. 

ELDERLY PROJECTS 667-C and 667-3: The Ipswich Housing Authority has a 
total of 120 elderly units that are located at Southern Manor (20) and Caroline 
Avenue (1)). The Southern Manor units are gas heated and the Caroline Avenue 
units are electrically heated. The shelter rent for the Caroline Avenue units is 
$54.00 per month and $50.00 per month for the Southern Manor units. Average age 
is 76 years young. On February 25, 1974, the Hot Lunch Program was started for a 
pilot program to include 50 elderly tenants. At times this program accommodated 
75 tenants and at one time 95 elderly tenants. Each Thursday, elderly guests have 
been invited from Ipswich and many from the surrounding elderly projects. Due to 
this guest invitation, other authorities are looking into this highly successful 
program. International Hot Lunch parties have been held. The Hawaiian Luau 
held May 26, 1974, was a tremendous success. All tenants were dressed in 
Hawaiian costumes, adding to the Hawaiian decorations and music. This Luau was 
photographed and recognized in the November-December 1974 National School 
Food Service Journal. Other Ethnic parties will be held during 1975. Flu shots were 
given to the elderly tenants at the Recreation Hall on October 10, 1974. Security 
safety chain locks were installed on the doors for all elderly units. 

707 RENT SUBSIDY PROGRAM: This Program provides subsidies for low 
income families, including elderly and disabled persons. It allows The Authority to 
rent privately owned apartments and pay a rent supplement to make up the dif- 
ference in the agreed total monthly rent. The Ipswich Housing Authority paid a 
total of $60,715.00 in 1974 in rent subsidies to private landlords for 65 units. The 1974 



54 



average share of rent paid by Rent Subsidy tenants to their landlords was $69.00 
per month for 1-2-3 and 4 bedroom units. 

MAINTENANCE MAN RONALD MARTINEAU WAS HIRED JUNE 3, 1974. 

There were five (5) deaths in the elderly projects and one (1) death in the 
Southern Heights project. To their families, we extend our most sincere sympathy. 

THE ESSEX COUNTY 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

Robert W. Spencer, Superintendent 

1974 was indeed a very unusual year for those of us whose duty it is to provide 
Ipswich and 22 other communities, with a program of mosquito control. While the 
winter precipitation averaged about normal, the total snow fall was below average 
due to a comparatively mild season. As a result our winter prehatch or ice dusting 
program for larval control was not as extensive as in previous years. However, 
because of the open winter with milder temperatures, the permanent phase of our 
program, that is ditching and dredging with power equipment to eliminate the 
mosquito breeding sources, benefitted greatly, experiencing far fewer in- 
terruptions than would be expected. 

The summer adulticiding or fogging program started in mid-June as the 
spring brood of mosquitoes emerged a little later than usual. They were great in 
number and had the rains of spring continued we could have anticipated a heavy 
mosquito population throughout the summer. Mother Nature interceded in our 
favor, however, and between July 5 and August 28, the area experienced the 
longest drought period since 1964. The result was a marked decrease in the sum- 
mertime mosquito nuisance. Even the coastal salt marshes though flooded 
periodically by high course tides, failed to produce until just prior to the Labor Day 
weekend. On August 24, the Project discontinued the spraying activity for the 
summer and concentrated all efforts for the remainder of the year on the per- 
manent work. 

In May a new Bombardier marsh crawler tractor with backhoe was purchased 
and on December 5 a new Bombardier tractor designed especially to pull a scavel 
plow was delivered. This machine is to be used exclusively to recut the many miles 
of ditching in the salt marshes of Ipswich, Essex, Rowley, Newbury, and Salis- 
bury, an important phase of our program which has suffered for the past two years 
because of the lack of suitable equipment. 

The runaway inflation that we are now experiencing has not spared the 
mosquito control program. The cost of insecticide has more than doubled since 
June 30, 1974. If the gasoline and other petroleum products used by the Project 
continue to climb in price there will be no alternative but to curtail the use of power 
equipment resulting in a forced reduction of all phases of the program and a return 
to manual labor in the clearing of brooks and streams. 

As this report is written, however, the Essex County Mosquito Control Project 
plans to continue its present program for the coming year. This program in effect 
since 1965 has made definite progress toward reducing the mosquito population in 
the district. 



55 



The following work was accomplished in Ipswich during 1974: 

Prehatch or winter ice dusting - 49 acres 
Application of larvicide to open water - 6 acres 
Brushing out along brooks and streams - 300 feet 

Upland ditching and dredging with power equipment 3,885 feet.* This work was 
accomplished off Town Farm Road, off Kimball Avenue in the vicinity of the 1640 
Hart House, along Potter Brook in the Plains Road area, off Little Neck Road, and 
off Burrage Road. 

Fogging to control adult mosquitoes on June 15, 29, July 13, 27, August 10, 24. 

We thank the residents of Ipswich for their continued interest and cooperation 
and look to 1975 as a year of further progress. 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Irving G. Small, Chairman 

The Committee held its organizational meeting early in September, at which 
time Mr. Irving G. Small was elected Chairman and Mrs. Mary E. Williamson was 
elected Vice Chairman. One other meeting was held in September, and one each in 
the months of October, November and December. 

The Committee has considered a request for the Board of Selectmen for advice 
on the question of whether the Town should adopt a dog-control by-law. While not 
wishing to commit itself either affirmatively or negatively on the strict policy 
question, the Committee has, nevertheless, offered for consideration of the 
Selectmen examples of dog-control legislation in force in other municipalities, 
together with observations which members deemed pertinent to problems of en- 
forcement and funding if the Town should enact such a by-law. 

The Chairman has participated in meetings of a "Steering Committee", so- 
called, comprised of representatives from various town boards, committees and 
departments and created under the auspices of the Board of Selectmen and the 
Planning Board to undertake the development of long-range planning and policy 
priorities for the Town. 

Finally, the Chairman and other members of the Committee have been pur- 
suing research studies commissioned by the Board of Selectmen in order to 
develop an index and summary of special state statutes and local town meeting 
actions affecting the town government or having the force of law within the Town. 



56 



MBTA ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

John C. Vincent, Jr., Chairman 

As Chairman of the MBTA Study Committee, I filed a report on behalf of the 
Committee at the Town Meeting in March of 1974. A copy of that report is available 
at the Town Manager's Office. 

Since March, the Committee has been principally involved in negotiating with 
the MBTA to retain train service to the Town in 1974 and beyond. Meetings of the 
Committee were held during the summer with Town and state officials and 
representatives of the MBTA. In the fall, members of the Committee, the Board of 
Selectmen and the Town Manager met many times with the MBTA, and in 
November successfully negotiated the retention of service subject to favorable 
action at the March 1975 Town Meeting. On behalf of this Committee, I would like 
to thank the Selectmen and the Town Manager for the time they have devoted to 
these difficult negotiations and for their concern and interest in working with me 
and our Committee to persuade the MBTA to continue service until the Town has 
an opportunity to express itself at our next Town Meeting. 

The Committee will be holding meetings starting early in 1975 to inform the 
Town as to why we believe train service should be retained even though at some 
cost to the Town. We will be meeting with other town bodies and groups with the 
expectation of winning broad support for entering into new contracts with the 
MBTA for 1975. In this age of increasing energy costs and pollution control, the 
Town of Ipswich must retain the option for its citizens of travel by train, as well as 
by automobile and bus. 



DOG OFFICER 

Maura Quinn 

During the past year, there were: 

8.dogs injured and destroyed 

45 dogs injured by motorists 

50 dogs killed by motorists 

3 unclaimed strays put to death 

29 strays were found new owners 

40 strays were returned to their owners 

863 dog complaints were checked out 

From March 31, 1974 to December 1974, the Town Clerk's Office had issued 735 
dog licenses. Approximately 785 dogs are unlicensed in Ipswich. 

57 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Frederic \$ inthrop. Jr.. Chairman 

1974 has been an active and successful year for your Conservation Com- 
mission. 

The March meeting capped two years of preparation by voting over- 
whelmingly in favor of the wetland zoning bylaw. With similar enthusiasm the 
town approved the acquisition of another 12 acres of land, in support of the ongoing 
efforts to protect the Dow Watershed. 

Also passed was the Scenic Roads bylaw which puts a degree of protection of 12 
of the town's more beautiful and historic roads. In addition, an amendment to the 
motorboat bylaw was approved limiting speed and horsepower on the river above 
theSylvania dam. 

Over the year, members of the Commission spent considerable time fur- 
thering certain of the Bicentennial projects, namely the construction of the 
Whipple House Pond and the two walkways. The commission also lent its support 
to Sylvania 's efforts to plug the leaks in their dam. For the first time in many years 
the fish ladder now has water flowing through it. 

In its third year the Dune Restoration program at Crane's was again a great 
success. Thanks to the High School, th? Forestry Department, and the Trustees of 
Reservations, over 20,000 beach grass seedlings were planted, fertilized and 

fenced in. 

The past year had its more mundane but equally important tasks, in particular 
those relating to the commission's responsibility for enforcing the state wetland 
laws. This involves the holding of hearings, issuance of permits, establishing or- 
ders of condition and taking action against violation. 

What of next year? Our goals include zoning of flood plains, management of 
town-owned forest lands, preserving agricultural land and promoting greater use 
of conservation restrictions. 

Concurrently, the commission will continue to work on the Open Space Plan. 
By making a careful inventory of the town's natural resources, we will be able to 
establish priorities and methods for saving what should be saved. This plan will 
provide a basis for determining where development should take place and where it 

should not. 

In these times of deepening recession, skyrocketing inflation and world food 
and energy shortages, it is absolutely essential that conservation not be considered 
a luxury which we can do without. Now more than ever we must conserve our 
natural resources — our forests, farm lands, minerals, water — and use them 
wisely. 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

Walter H. Hulbert, Jr. Superintendent 

There were 95 interments, compared to 96 in 1973, 109 in 1972 and 117 in 1971. 

58 



One eight-grave lot, ten four-grave lots, nine two-grave lots and three single 
graves were sold with perpetual care. Eight lots were converted from annual care 
to perpetual care. Seven four-grave lots, four two-grave lots and one single grave 
were awarded by the American Legion, for Veterans and their Families, with no 
revenue for care of these lots. 

Sixty-one monument foundations were dug and laid. Sixteen sets of lot corner 
bounds were installed. 

Fourteen monuments and lot damage were repaired at a cost of $754.10. This 
was caused by vandals. Property damage to Locust Grove Fence was repaired, 
this cost was paid for by insurance company of car owner. 

On our equipment replacement program, we purchased: one portable 
generator; one Parker power-driven sweeper for lot sweeping; and five 21" push 
type mowers. 

Graded and seeded an area in Cowles Memorial Cemetery. Cleared back all 
boundary lines in all cemeteries. Limed and fertilized lots in Highland and New 
Highland Cemeteries. 

Six avenues were resurfaced with two hundred f ifty-se> en tons of hot top. One 
hundred eighty feet of water extension was done this fall. 

All interment records were microfilmed This is dor.e on an annual basis to 
protect us in case of fire. 

During the winter months the cemetery four-wheel drive kept the avenues 
plowed. It also assisted the Public Works in snow plowing. 

Following is list of receipts for services rendered by the Department for 1974 : 

Interment openings $ 5,305.00 

Chapel tent rentals 705.00 

Sale of Lots 2,415.00 

Perpetual Care Income 10,500.00 

Perpetual Flower Fund Income 925.00 

Annual Care Income 31 .00 

Foundations & Bounds Set 1,189.00 



$21,070.00 



Perpetual Care Deposits $2,870.00 

Annual Care Converted to Perpetual Care 2,214.00 

Perpetual Flower Fund Deposits 1,140.00 

$6,224.00 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Kevin D. McElhinney, Director 

The Public Works Department coordinates the activities of the Highway, 
Forestry, Water, Sewer, Town Hall Building Maintenance and Equipment 
Maintenance Divisions to assure the most effective operations. Personnel are 
assigned to specific divisions, however, are interchanged to assist with larger 
projects as required. 



59 




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(Ipswich Chronicle) 



LINEBROOK ROAD CURVE 

Hazardous curve on Linebrook Road was straightened. 

HIGHWAY DIVISION: 

Norman Stone, Foreman 

Approximately 2400 feet of Linebrook Road has been rebuilt as part of a 
continuing project whereby the cost is shared by State, County and Town Govern- 
ments. 

Three major drainage projects were undertaken as capital expenditures, 
namely: Kimball Avenue, Charlotte Road and Warner Road. 

As part of a continuing maintenance project, the following roadways had 
surface treatment consisting of oil, stone and sand mixture: 



Applewood Drive 
Arrowhead Trail 
Boxf ord Road 
Capeview Road 
Damon Avenue 
East Street 2 



Grant's Court 
Hillside Road 
Newmarch Street 
North Ridge Road 
Old England Road 
Old Right Road 



Sky top Road 
Stage Hill Road 
Valley Drive 
Willowdale Road 
Wood's Lane 



A bituminous wearing surface was applied on the following roadways: 
Green Street Sawyer Street County Road 

Cogswell Street Wainwright Street Charlotte Road 

South Main Street 

In addition, Division Personnel worked on snow and ice operations, drainage 
maintenance and other varied projects throughout the Town. 



60 



BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION: 

With the completion of the Electric Light Building on High Street, work has 
been undertaken whereby the former quarters on Elm Street are being renovated 
and various departments are being relocated from the Town Hall Building. 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION: 

JohnMcParland, Foreman 

All Town owned vehicles were serviced and repaired at the Town Garage. 
Records were kept to show maintenance costs and gas and oil usage on each in- 
dividual vehicle; statistical records of these expenses are maintained at the Public 
Works Administration Office. 

FORESTRY DIVISION: 

Armand Michaud, Tree Warden 

This division is charged with all Town tree work. Duties also include line 
clearing for the Electric Department and the Mosquito Control program. 

Approximately 175 trees were removed. As part of a special program, 7 elm 
trees were treated for control of dutch" elm disease. Department personnel have 
checked these trees after treatment and positive results have been reported. It is 
hoped the continuation of this treatment can be sustained to help preserve the elm 
trees which have long been a source of pride to the Town of Ipswich. 

WATER DIVISION: 

Henry Chouinard, Foreman 

Booster Pumping Stations were installed on Oakhurst and Cedarview Avenues 
to alleviate poor pressure which has been affecting the areas for many years. 

Water supplies were dangerously low during the summer and a water ban was 
instituted. The water shortage was due to the high iron prevalent in the Winthrop 
Wells which necessitated curtailing the use of these wells. It is hoped that monies 
will be appropriated at the Town Meeting to alleviate this problem. 

A brief summation of the division's functions is as follows: 



New Meters Installed: 
Meters Replaced: 
Services Turned On: 
Services Turned Off: 
New Services: 
Services Discontinued: 
Hydrants Installed: 
Hydrants Removed: 
New Water Mains Installed 

k Total Length of Mains: 
WATER SERVICES: 
Metered Services: 
Unmetered Services: 
Summer Services: 



1972 


1973 


1974 


102 


43 


44 


131 


244 


96 


167 


164 


132 


163 


145 


122 


55 


63 


34 


1 


6 


2 


3 


10 

















3,460' 


2,900' 




386,707' 


389,607' 




3,031 


3,063 




142 


142 




173 


173 



TOTAL SERVICES: 3,346 3,378 



61 



WATER USAGES: (Gallons) 
Dow's Reservoir 
Brown's Well 
Winthrop Wells 
Mile Lane Well 



223,581,800 157,073,600 197,413,500 

114,336,850 175,684,800 94,789,000 

141,507,500 115,296,500 68,483,600 

— 17,212,700 27,580,000 



479,426,150 465,267,600 388,266,100 

2,314,000 



TOTAL WATER USAGE: 
HIGHEST DAY: February 24, 1974 

SEWER DIVISION: 

Chester Wile, Treatment Plant Operator 

Sewer extension to County Manor along South Main Street and County Road was 
completed and the Veterans Housing has been connected to the Municipal Sewage 
System. 

Records were kept and divisional statistics are as follows: 





1972 


1973 


1974 


Sewage Trea ted-Daily Average: (Gallons) 


628,184 


542,150 


512,421 


Total Sewage Treated: (Gallons) 


229,287,000 


197,885,000 


187,034,000 


New Connections: 


99 


62 


72 


Total Connections: 




984 


1,056 


Chlorine Used: (Tons) 


16.2 


16.125 


15.45 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Ralph Hebert 



Construction Valuations 

Fees Collected 

Occupancy Permits Issued 

Permits, Building Issued 

New Construction-Misc. Construction 

(additions, remodeling, 

signs, pools and siding) 



1974 


1973 


850,314.00 


2,126,611.00 


1,755.50 


3,175.50 


56 


101 


14 


59 



173 



127 



The Massachusetts State Building Code, which is the first uniform building 
code for all Cities and Towns of the Commonwealth, was implemented effective 
January 1, 1975. The New regulations transfer much of the responsibility held by 
the State in the matter of Building Inspections to the local inspectors. The State 
Inspectors will also supervise and act as an appeals body to decisions of local in- 
spectors. 



62 




SECONDARY SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT, Fowler's Lane (Ipswich 

Chronicle) 

Ground breaking ceremonies for the new Secondary Sewage Treatment 

Plant were held in 1974 and construction commenced. 



63 



/ 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




School Committee Members — Seated, Left to Right — Mrs. Patricia 
Manning, Term Expires 1977; Mr. Paul K. Gahm, Chairman, Term 
Expires 1975; Mrs. Annette George, Term Expires 1977. Standing — Mr. 
Walter J. Pojasek, Term Expires 1976; Lyn Carleton, Student 
Representative; Mr. James F. Collins, Term Expires 1975; Mr. Graham 
Reedy, Term Expires 1975; Mrs. M.L. Scudder, Term Expires 1975. 

ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 



ENROLLMENT CHART BY GRADES 1969-1974 



GRADE 


1969 


1970 


1971 


1972 


1973 


1974 


K 


216 


187 


164 


171 


165 


191 


Nongraded Primary ( 1970 & 1971 ) 




204 


276 








1 


225 


159 


97 


183 


197 


182 


2 


229 


122 


141 


220 


198 


194 


3 


188 


235 


185 


250 


208 


200 


4 


195 


203 


239 


214 


242 


197 


5 


214 


206 


210 


224 


219 


237 


6 


218 


225 


213 


203 


232 


224 


7 


226 


216 


228 


213 


202 


223 


8 


228 


217 


215 


224 


214 


201 


9 


185 


220 


213 


200 


177 


175 


10 


195 


180 


218 


213 


171 


180 


11 


183 


197 


177 


210 


174 


167 


12 


185 


174 


198 


177 


180 


177 


P.G. 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 




Sp.Ed. 


27 


27 


27 


25 


4 


8 


TOTALS 


2715 


2774 


2802 


2728 


2584 


2556 



64 



ENROLLMENT CHART- OCTOBER 1, 1974 

Sp. 

GRADE K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Ed. TOTAL 

Doyon 63 69 61 81 83 86 85 8 536 

Burley 49 51 45 49 16 210 

Shatswell 41 41 63 43 188 

Boone Hall 38 21 25 27 111 

Baptist 45 45 

Winthrop 53 151 139 343 

Jr. High 223 201 424 

Sr. High 175 180 167 177 699 

TOTAL 191 182 194 200 197 237 224 223 201 175 180 167 177 8 2556 

EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED TO MINORS -1974 



Age Age 

14-16 16-18 Total 



Boys 12 33 45 

Girls ii 52 63 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

John H. Stella 

On October 1, 1974, the total school enrollment was 2,556, a decrease of 28 as 
compared to October 1, 1973. 

The Whittier Regional School continues to service Ipswich students and as of 
October 1, 1974, 130 Ipswich students were enrolled in that school. This includes an 
increase of 22 over October 1, 1973. 

Several new professional staff members were added to strengthen various 
curriculum areas. They are as follows: 

1 Full-time Librarian for the Burley-Shatswell Schools. 
1 Full-time Business Teacher for the High School. 
1 Full-time Reading Teacher for the Junior High School. 
1 60 percent Math Teacher for the High School. 

65 




JohnH. Stella, Superintendent of Schools 



Chapter 766, the Special Needs Legislation, became mandatory on September 
1, 1974. The School Committee authorized the addition of four professional staff 
members to implement this landmark legislation. 

At the special Town Meeting held in the- Fall of 1974, the School Committee 
requested $44,680.00 to fulfill the provisions of the transportation contract. The cost 
of transporting public school children per year is $257,337.00. This amount includes 
$18,000.00 for two buses for out-of-town busing. The School Committee voted to 
transport children to schools out of town when the enrollments of that school 
reached 20 or more, as of September 1st of the school year. At the present time, 
Ipswich is providing transportation to children who attend Shore Country Day 
School in Beverly and St. Mary's School in Danvers. 

The School Department is still renting the basement of the Baptist Church to 
educate 48 elementary children for which we pay $4,300.00 rent per year. We are 
also renting Boone Hall to educate over 100 children. The rental cost to the Town 
amounts to $9,000.00 per year for the use of the Boone Hall facility. 



66 



On September 12, 1974, the Ipswich School Committee met with the School 
Building Needs Committee and, after some discussion, moved unanimously that 
the administration be authorized to prepare educational specifications for a 500-700 
student elementary school. The School Committee approved the specifications and 
a meeting was held with the State Building Assistance Bureau representatives on 
December 30, 1974 in Boston. The specifications, from the reactions we received in 
Boston, will be approved. 

I extend to the School Committee my sincere appreciation for their dedication 
and interest in providing for the students of Ipswich the best possible education. 

I extend to all school personnel my sincere appreciation for their excellent 
cooperation and I extend my deep appreciation to all the town agencies for their 
excellent cooperation with the schools. 

Following are reports from the principals and directors. 




Supervisors, Ipswich Public Schools Reading Left to Right — Front Row 
— Mr. Samuel B. Levy, Principal, Winthr op-Baptist Schools; Mrs. Lyn 
Huttunen, Director of Curriculum ; Mr. Joseph R. Rogers, Principal, Ips- 
wich High School; Mrs. Marcia J. Fowler, Principal , Burley, Shatswell 
and Boone Hall; Mr. William E. Waitt, Jr., Principal, Doyon School. Back 
Row — Mr. John E. Huttunen, Principal, Ralph C. Whipple Memorial 
School; Mr. Joseph J. Battaglio, Director, Pupil Personnel Services. 



67 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Joseph R. Rogers, Principal 

Enrollment as of January 1, 1975: 

Freshmen 175 

Sophomores 177 

Juniors 163 

Seniors 176 

P.G. 1 



692 

September found the opening Of school with approximately the same number 
of students, 700, and two less faculty members. Our enrollment has remained 
steady, and from indications there will be little deviation from 700-750 pupils 
during the next five years. Heavy enrollments are evident in grades 5, 6 and 7. 

Teachers are remaining at their jobs and little or no mobility exists, thus 
assuring a stable faculty, which in turn creates a stability in the school. 

Our building is ten years old and is showing definite signs of use; maintenance 
costs and needs are increasing at an alarming rate. Our custodial staff work 
diligently to keep the facility functioning as it should. The building is used day and 
night by the entire community, as it should. However, this constant usage 11 
months of the year is taking its toll on the building. 

Curriculum continues to change with the needs of our student body. While 
changes are being made, no new programs are being offered. At present one of our 
biggest needs is to develop and implement a health education program. Our 
students are totally unaware of proper nutrition and health as is evidenced by our 
nation's problems with tobacco, alcohol, drugs, obesity and improper diet. 
Hopefully, we can begin a program, if monies become available, in September of 
1975. 

While we claim to be a comprehensive high school, our offerings are limited 
due to lack of facilities and money. However, I feel that we are generally meeting 
most of the academic needs of Ipswich's adolescent population. 



RALPH C. WHIPPLE MEMORIAL 
JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

John Huttenan, Principal 

Enrollment 

The enrollment figures for the 1974-1975 school year are as follows: 

Grade 7 222 

Grade 8 204 

Total 426 

68 



Evaluation 

A team of professional educators spent four days at our school in January of 
this year for the purpose of conducting a formal evaluation of our school plant, 
facilities and programs. This evaluation was conducted under the direction and 
format set up by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. 

Our staff felt that the evaluation was generally quite supportive of our efforts 
and showed that we are progressing in the right direction. The most negative 
aspect of the evaluation dealt with our building and facilities. 

Written copies of the formal evaluation are available at the public library, 
school library, and superintendent's office. Anyone wishing to review the report, is 
invited to do so. As time progresses various parts of the evaluation will be 
reviewed and discussed at school committee meetings. 

Math Laboratory 

In our continuing attempts to individualize our mathematics programs a math 
laboratory was constructed between rooms 205 and 206. The lab contains enrich- 
ment materials, which enables us to meet the needs of students with wide ranges of 
ability. It also containsa wide range of remedial materials. Special thanks should 
be given to our math teachers and Director of Curriculum for obtaining $4,756.10 
under Title III to stock the lab with materials ranging from a calculator to 
motivational math games. 

Reading Laboratory 

In addition to a new math lab, our facilities for reading were modified to in- 
clude space for remedial reading and a specific learning disabilities center. Again, 
federal monies were obtained to acquire additional materials as well as to carpet 
the entire reading center. With these modifications and with the addition of a 
teacher and an aide, we feel that positive steps have been taken to improve our 
reading program. 

Buildings andGrounds 

In an attempt to brighten the appearance of the interior of the building our 
lockers were painted during the summer with bright colors. This idea came from 
the student council and they painted approximately one-third of the lockers during 
vacation periods. Money will be budgeted to paint our stairways and to improve 
lighting in our corridors. 

In conclussion, I would like to thank the superintendent, school committee, and 
community for the support offered to the junior high students and staff. 



PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

William E. Waitt, Jr., Principal 

Doyon School continued to prosper during 1974. Student population continued 
at a high level. Implementation of the provisions of Chapter 766 with our special 
needs children provided stimulating staff planning. 

69 



Increasing public use of our school and grounds is gratifying. 

ORGANIZATION. The school continues to operate as a seven-year (K-6) 
elementary school, with three sections of each grade, and with three rooms 
devoted to servicing children with serious special needs. Enrollment from January 
to June averaged 542 students. School opened in September with a student 
population of 536, which represents a slight decrease over 1973. 

TEACHING PERSONNEL. Doyon has a staff of 36 full and part-time 
professionals, which include 20 tenure teachers, 5 tenure candidates, 5 second-year 
teachers and 6 first-year teachers. In addition 3 staff members are on leave of 
absence. 

A service staff of 20 includes 3 teacher aides, 3 lunch aides, 1 full time 
custodian, 3 part-time custodians, a nurse, a secretary and 8 cafeteria employees. 

GENERAL. Work continues in improving curriculum, especially in the skills 
areas of math, science and reading. 

Several parents continue to assist in our library and in classroom instruction. 
Our parent advisory committee continues to be a positive group, giving advice on 
our progress and aid in determining our direction. 



WINTHROP and BAPTIST SCHOOLS 

Samuel B. Levy, Principal 

The Winthrop-Baptist Schools house two classes of grade 4, six of grade five 
and six classes of grade six at the Winthrop School and two classes of grade four at 
the Baptist School. At the end of the year Winthrop had 348 students and the Baptist 
School 45 students. The Winthrop Resource Center serves both of the schools and 
includes a well stocked library with reference works, general reading materials 
and film, audio and visual material available for individual and group research 
work. A shared librarian and a corps of dedicated volunteer workers supervise the 
center's operation. 

The school day is 6 hours and 15 minutes. Class "A" lunches are served in the 
Winthrop Cafeteria for Winthrop and Baptist students. Bus transportation is 
provided for one-half of the students. 

The school provides a standard elementary school curriculum with a flexible 
structure. Imaginative and innovative approaches are employed to enliven 
students' interest in their education. Specialists operate in the areas of art, music 
and physical education. Instrumental music lessons are provided. An active 
chorus of over 100 girls and 40 boys meet weekly. Provisions are made for students 
in the area of learning disabilities and speech therapy. A Title I, ESEA Project 
provides for a Director and trained teacher aides to work in the area of remedial 
reading and mathematics. The Title I Parents Advisory Council is an active and 
important part of this project. 

In addition to the classroom teachers, the staff includes vocal music, in- 
strumental music and art specialists, a full-time physical education teacher, 2 full- 

70 



time learning disabilities specialists, a full-time guidance counselor, a part-time 
guidance counselor and a consulting psychologist. A nurse, a secretary, two full- 
time custodians, two lunchroom aides and three cafeteria workers complete the 
staff. 

A large number of the staff are actively engaged in post-graduate work. The 
entire staff is involved in scheduled workshops in the area of curriculum 
development in the various disciplines. 

Many civic, church and private groups avail themselves of the opportunity to 
use our facilities and equipment after school, evenings and weekends. Included in 
these groups are Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Coast Guard Auxiliary, Square Dance 
Clubs, Greek School classes, Massachusetts A.C.L.D. group activities, Con- 
servation group activities, Town functions and student fund-raising car wash 
activities. 



BURLEY, SHATSWELL AND 
BOONE HALL SCHOOLS 

Marcia J. Fowler, Principal 





Enrollment 513 




Burley School 


Kindergarten 
Grades 1-3 
Grade 4 


2 sessions 
2 classes each 
1 class 


Shateswell School 


Kindergarten 
Grades 1-2 
Grade 2-3 
Grade 3 


2 sessions 
2 classes each 
1 class 
1 class 


Boone Hall School 


Kingergarten 
Grades 1-3 


2 sessions 
1 class each 



Each of the schools has been organized into self-contained classes and has 
continued with the implementation of individualized learning. Major efforts have 
been expended in continuing to improve vertical continuity and stressing mastery 
of basic skills as a foundation for facilitating development of individual gifts and 
interests. 

Special services have been provided in remedial reading, speech, specific 
learning disabilities, guidance and learning center by personnel specially qualified 
in these areas. Children have also been the recipients of regular classes in art, 
music and physical education with specialists. Significant integration has been 
accomplished as a result of the effort of the classroom and specialist teaching 
team. 



71 



DIRECTOR OF CURRICULUM 

Lyn Huttenan 

Curriculum development activities during 1974 have evolved from a careful 
needs assessment with priorities established for a continuing thrust in K-12 
programming and improved communications. 

Federal Projects: Implementing Innovative Ideas 

During 1974, Ipswich competed for Federal monies and was successful in 
obtaining funding in every area in which application was made. These projects are 
as follows: 

(1) Title I -Elementary and 

( 1 ) Title I - Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Ipswich received $49,234.55 
for a project specifically designed to meet the needs of children in the basic 
skill areas of mathematics and reading. A remedial reading teacher, three 
classroom teacher-supervisors, and twelve para-professionals plus specialized 
equipment and materials are provided for participants from Burley, Shatswell, 
Boone Hall, Winthrop-Baptist and the Junior High Schools. 

(2) Title II, E.S.E.A. Guaranteed support on the local level has provided us with 
an additional $3,084.00 for library and media materials at the high school. 

(3) Title III, E.S.E.A. A grant of $5,000.00 (50 percent reimbursed - 50 percent 
school budget) provided materials to establish a mathematics laboratory at 
the junior high school. 

(4) Title III, National Defense Education Act Two thousand four hundred eighty- 
one dollars has been awarded to the area of Social Studies, Winthrop School, for 
materials geared to the understanding of man and cultures. 

(5) Title II - Vocational Act. Ipswich was the recipient of one of the largest grants 
given in the state this year under Vocational Education. Twenty-one thousand 
nine hundred fifteen dollars was awarded for new equipment and materials to 
help establish a new program in Business Education at the high school. 



Special Projects Budget: A Pathway to Accomplishments Such as the Following: 



( 1 ) Piloting of Career Education materials and activities in grades 5, 8, 9-12. 

(2) An individualized math record-keeping system and related objectives, grades 
4-8. 

(3) A smoking unit for grades 3-8. 

(4) Piloting of individualized materials in Language Arts. 

(5) Curriculum guides in Music, Art, and Foreign Language. 



Community and School Cooperation: A Vital Force in Curriculum Development 

The Title I, P.A.C. under the direction of Chairman, Mrs. Betty Siegel; The 
Friends of the Arts under the direction of Chairman, Mrs. Shirley Freeman; and 
the many community representatives of vocational areas who assisted with our 
most successful Career Day at the high school have provided service and 
assistance this past year. 



72 



Summary: 

In working toward the accomplishment of our curriculum goals, many persons 
have contributed much time and energy. Mr. Stella, our Superintendent, members 
of the School Committee, teachers, administrators, students, and members of the 
community have given service to the never-ending task of viable curriculum 
development in our schools. 



PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Joseph J, Battaglio, Director 

Chapter 766, the landmark educational law, has been in effect since September 
of this year. Its impact upon Ipswich, while in no sense as traumatic as ex- 
perienced by others, has been significant in many ways. The direction of Ipswich 
education, long committed to 766 philosophical objectives has not changed. The 
procedure for attaining those objectives, and the resources, for carrying them out 
have been modified and strengthened. An overview of significant realignments 
and changes follows: 

I. Programs and personnel 

A. Guidance - No additions. 

Redefinition of role as parent and child advocates. Counselors 
assume Chapter 766 responsibilities for receiving and directing 
special needs referrals, for participation in core evaluations, and 
for monitoring and assessing special needs programs in their 
schools. 

B. Special needs - Four new personnel. 

1. Core Evaluation Team Chairperson - charged with organizing 

and chairing meetings, and for overseeing the drafting of in- 
dividualized educational prescriptions for each child-student 
referred for special needs evaluation. 

a. Approximate evaluations conducted to date - 77 

b. Evaluations scheduled for January - 28 

c. Projected estimate for the current school year 250-300 
evaluations 

2. Teacher, special needs (specific learning disabilities) Junior 

High School - Intensive remediation for students with severe 
language disabilities; regular tutoring for less severe cases. 

3. Teacher, special needs (behavioral problems) Winthrop School 

and Junior High School - Individual counseling and therapy; 
Diagnostics and recommendations to CET's; close classroom 
support for children; resource assistance to teachers. 

4. Teacher, special needs (developmental disabilities) Winthrop 

School - Individualized and small group instruction in basic 
skills remediation (language arts, math, perceptual activities). 



73 



II. Building and space - Pupil personnel programs are system-wide "in house" 
programs, but the space facilities to accommodate them in the schools is 
marginal at best. With the exception of the Doyon School, where excellent 
special needs facilities have become over-taxed, most programs operate on a 
"make-do" basis. This year, additional space was improvised at the Winthrop 
School by dividing a classroom. A temporary space for a new Junior High 
School program resulted by using study carrels in the guidance space. In most 
schools, speech therapy, physical therapy, health services operate out of 
whatever space is available, often to the detriment of services to children. 
Adequate physical examinations, required by law, are almost impossible to 
conduct under present conditions. Most special classes operate under severe 
space restrictions, and space is unavailable for needed programs at the Burley 
and Shatswell Schools. 

This year, under the good offices of the Town Manager, space for a 
central office was acquired at the Memorial Building. 

III. Needs - Ipswich may take justifiable pride in the leadership position 
established in meeting the special needs of children. But while the course has 
been charted, the road is long. We still fall short in certain areas. Core 
evaluations conducted to date indicate weaknesses in delivery of services to 
children needing speech and physical therapy, and language remediation. The 
special needs census reveals a rather large gap between services required and 
services presently being provided. Space needs are critical in certain areas. I 
am grateful for the sensitivity to these needs in the past and remain optimistic 
that town support expressed through policy decisions by the School Committee 
will advance us toward the ultimate objective of appropriate services for all 
children. 



SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS 
COMMITTEE 

William Craft, Chairman 

During the past 18 months, the School Building Needs Committee has un- 
dertaken an extensive analysis of the total Ipswich School facilities in order to 
determine the best set of solutions for alleviating the overcrowded conditions and 
deficiencies at each level. As an important part of this activity, the Committee 
selected the Boston architectural and planning firm of Johnson-Hotvedt and 
Associates, Inc. to undertake a structural and functional evaluation of the existing 
school buildings^and to make recommendations as to the best solutions. (The full 
report is available in the Town Library.) The results of this evaluation lead to the 
establishment of the following priorities by the School Building Needs Committee: 

1. Construct a new 600-student elementary school to replace the present Burley 

and Shateswell Schools and eliminate the rental of space at Boone Hall and 
Baptist. 

2. Renovate the present Junior High School using Shatswell as an annex and-or 

construct an addition to the present High School. The order of this phasing 
depends upon the priority assigned to problems for each school. 



74 



These priorities were endorsed by The School Committee at its September 12, 1974 
meeting. 

Following the submission and acceptance of the Preliminary Report, the 
School Building Needs Committee has focused on the first priority — a new 
elementary school. To this end, a further study has been undertaken by Johnson- 
Hotvedt and Associates, Inc., to determine a suitable site and prepare a 
preliminary design to be presented at the March 1975 Town Meeting. The final site 
selection, based on an analysis of all available sites in the Town, is expected in 
January. At the same time educational specifications and project costs are being 
reviewed in order that preliminary design may be completed in time for the March 
Town Meeting. 

By acting favorably on the School Building Needs Committee proposal for a 
new elementary school at the March 1975 Town Meeting, the Town may realize a 
potential savings of $500,000 - $750,000 in the financing of the new school. The Town 
is currently eligible for 65 percent reimbursement from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts for new school construction. As of July 1, 1975, the State reim- 
bursement rate for Ipswich will drop to 50 percent. 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES FOR 1974 



Nancy Hayden Adams 
Jan Marie Amerio 
Mary Stephanie Aponas 
Cindy Carol Appeltofft 

* Deborah Ann Bartnicki 
Donna Jean Bartnicki 

t* Carol Elizabeth Belcher 
Diana Lee Bod well 
Sarah Mae Brett 

* Patricia Jean Campus 
Janet Chapman 
Margaret Elizabeth Chase 
Kathy Christopher 
Elizabeth Louise Ciolek 

t* Maria Dolores Clines 
• Diane Louise Comeau 
Kathryn Anne Comeau 
Alexis Demetrakopoulos 
AnneD. Domoracki 
Anne Elizabeth Dort 
Karen Marie Downey 

* Eileen Fairley Eby 
Laurinda Gay Errico 

t* Penny Jayne Eustace 

Diane A. Fessenden 
f* Holly Elaine Foster 

* Eleanor Galanis 
Betsy Anne Gallop 
Marie Anne Gardella 



Linda Joe George 
Donna M. Gwinn 
Dale Anne Hardy Spaulding 
Nancy E. Harrigan 

* Dianne Marie Heimbecker 
Deborah Lee Hovey 

* Pamela Ruth Howard 

* Stephanies. Johnson 
Joanne Kafulides 

t* Christina E.Keefe 

* Lorna Ruth Kenney 
Bonnie A. Kimball 

Anne Marie Klimaszewski 
Julie Ann Kotek 
Patricia Louise Krupanski 
t * Jane Christine Kulik 
Nancy Jean LaPlante 
Cindy Marie Leet 

* Noelle Fraser Lloyd 
Carrie L. MacAulay 

f* Virginia Leigh Mackay-Smith 

* Marlene Elaine Markos 
Valerie Markos 

* Janice Marie Martin 
Debbie Joyce Marvin 
Rosemary Bernadette Mazzola 
Susan C. McConologue 

f* Sarah Elizabeth McManaway 
Ellin Marlowe McSweeney 



75 



t* Patricia Anne Meunier 

* Cynthia Anne Meyer 
Lois Ann Nicholson 
Marcia Jean Pappalimberis 
Janet Pappas 

Janet Noreen Parker 
Cheryl Anita Peabody 
Debbie Lynn Pendexter 

* Carol Helen Peters 

* Sharon Elizabeth Proctor 
Maria Jeanne Ragosta 
Sarah Frances Reynolds 
Rebecca Jo Rogers 

t* Patricia Ann Rygielski 
f * Miriam Jane Saunders 

Jody Margaret Sheppard 

Lee Ann Simard 

Pamela Dale Smith 

* Pamela Sue Smith 
Pamela A. Sotiropoulos 
Kathleen Ann Stevens 
Marilyn Alice Sullivan 
Karen L. Surette 
Kathleen R. Sweeney 

* Laurie Anne Thompson 
Suellen Thompson 

* Joyce F.Thurber 

* Robin Ann Tougas 

* Louise Marie Tremblay 

* Christine Tsoutsouras 

* Marianne Tyniec 

* Nancy Eileen Vickery 
Mary Helen Walsh 
Rosemary Ann Whitcomb 

I* Ellen Wile 

* Jeanne Abigail Williamson 
Michele Patrice Wilson 

f* Karen J. Zabelski 

* Virginia Zeroulias 
Peter Charles Amaro 
David Armstrong Anderson 
Brian Scott Atkinson 
Andrew Avelis Jr. 
Dennis G. Beaupre 

John David Benedix 
John Douglas Bradley 
David R. Brouillette 
Timothy K. Campbell 
Donald J. Ciavola 

* Charles K. Cogan 
William Steven Comeau 
Michael Scott Crocetti 
Neil Evan DeMario 

* Bruce William DeTrude 
Garland Daniel Dort 
Thomas Sumner Eaton 
George M. Eliopoulos 



t* 



Mark Alan Faulhaber 
Douglas James Fithian 
Donald Raymond Francis 
Peter L. Griffin 
Mark Edmond Hobbs 
Norman Robert Hopping Jr. 
Joshua Hillel Israelsohn 
Michael Richard Kaszuba 
Anthony Frank Richard Klos 
Daniel John Ladd 
Thomas Paul Lampropoulos 
William L. Larson 
Mark Douglas Lees 
Gary Michael Lemire 
David Michael Levesque 
Roger William Louis 
Roger William MacDonald 
John Peter Markos 
Henry Charles MacNeill III 
Robert B. Marchand 
Kevin Alfred Marcorelle 
Richard David Markewicz 
Bradford A. Mills 
Kenneth Sebastian Mollica 
William Arthur Nicholson 
Stephen Francis O'Connell 
Jeffrey Michael-Steven Palen 
John C.Palis 
John Nicholas Pappas 
Christos Alexander Pechilis 
James Speros Pechilis Jr. 
Daniel James Perley 
John Henry Perkins 3rd 
Mark W. Phaneuf 
David Charles Pickul 
David Stanford Players Jr. 
Richard S.Pojasek 
David Joseph Prisby 
Richard Putur 
Timothy Frank Rose 
Richard John Schreuer 
Joseph Sharpe 
Norman F. Sheppard Jr. 
John Edward Soroka 
John James Sotis 
James Phillip Stewart 
Robert Mark Stone 
Robert K. Sullivan 
Michael Patrick Sweeney 
David Merle Swicker 
Edward Paul Sylvia 
David Michael Wegzyn 
William Harland Wile 
Stephen C.Williams 



* Honors 

t Member of National Honor Society 



t* 
t* 



76 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

POLICE EMERGENCY 356-4343 

FIRE EMERGENCY 356-4321 

Be sure to give your name and address as well as the nature of your emergency 
clearly. Do not hang up until you are sure that your message has been understood. 

FOR ANSWERS ON: CALL THE: TELEPHONE 

Assessments Office of the Assessor. . . . 356-4010 

Payment of Taxes Treasurer and Collector. . 356-3100 

Payment of Water and Light Bills Treasurerand Collector. . 356-3100 

Billing, Water and Light Billing Office 356-4830 

Birth, Death, Marriage Certificates Town Clerk's Office 356-4161 

Building Building Inspector 356-4900 

Cemeteries Cemetery Superintendent 356-3933 

Civil Defense Junior High School 356-4342 

Dog, Hunting, Fishing Licenses Town Clerk's Office 356-4161 

Education Information School Superintendent. . . . 356-2935 

Elections, Voting, Registration Town Clerk's Office 356-4161 

Electric Electric Light Dept 356-4331 

Engineering Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Fire, Routine Fire Department 356-4322 

Health, Sanitation, Rubbish, Garbage Board of Health 356-4900 

Highway and Streets Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Library Librarian 356-4646 

Licensing Authority Board of Selectmen 356-2262 

Oil Burner Permits Fire Chief 356-4322 

Permits for Burning Fire Department. . 356-4322 

Permits for Dumping Board of Health 356-4900 

Recreation Recreation and Parks 356-3767 

Schools Burley School 356-2666 

High School 356-3137 

Junior High School 356-3535 

Doyon School 356-5506 

Shatswell School 356-2312 

Winthrop School 356-2976 

Nurse 356-5507 

356-3535 

Sewer Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Veteran's Services Veteran's Agent 356-3915 

Water Problems Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Youth Drop In Center 356-0312 

MEETINGS DAY & TIME PLACE 

Annual Town Meeting 1st Mon. in March High School 

Annual Town Election 2nd Mon. in March Precinct Polling Place 

Conservation Commission 1st & 3rd Thurs. ea. mo. Town Hall 

Finance Committee 1st Wed. each mo. Payne School 

Board of Health 2nd Thurs. ea. mo. Town Hall 

Library Trustees 3rd Mon. ea. mo. Library 

Planning Board Every other Tues. Town Hall 

Recreation & Parks Com. 2nd Wed. ea. mo. Memorial Bldg. 

School Committee 1st & 3rd Thurs. ea. mo. To Be Announced 



77 



Selectmen 

Historical Commission 
Cemetery Commission 
Housing Authority 
Shellfish Advisory Com. 
Youth Commission 



Every Monday 
2nd & 4th Wed. ea. mo. 
IstFri. ea. mo. 
2ndTues. ea. mo. 
3rdWed. ea. mo. 



Court Room 

Town Hall 

Cemetery Office 

Community Bldg. Caroline Ave. 

Town Hall 



2nd & 4th Tues. ea. mo. Drop In Center 



IPSWICH AT A GLANCE 

Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts in Essex County 

Founded 1633 - Incorporated 1634 

Ipswich is in the 6th Congressional District. 

Our Representative is Michael J. Harrington (D) 

Ipswich is in the 3rd Senatorial District. 

Our Senator is William L. Saltonstall(R) 

Ipswich is in the 2nd Essex District. 

Our Representative in General Court is David J. Lane (R). 

The Annual Town Meeting is on the first Monday in March at the High School. 

The Annual Elections are the second Monday in March at each Precinct Place 



Government: 

Location: 

Area: 

Geographical 

Center: 

Population: 
Transportation: 

Tax rate: 

Total Value: 

Fire Dept: 

Police Dept: 

Water: 

Sewer: 

Electricity: 

Gas: 

Recreational 

Facilities: 



Selectmen - Town Manager Charter - New England Town 

Meeting 

Centrally Located on Massachusetts' North Shore - 35 Miles 

N.E. of Boston -Driving Time 45 minutes 

33.35 Square miles -21,344 acres 

Pedrick House, corner of Jeffrey's Neck Road and Ocean 
Drive 

(1971)11,188 

Boston & Maine R.R. - Frequent Rail service - Train time to 
Boston 50 Minutes - U.S. Route 1, U.S. Route 1A - Harbor 
Facilities - Taxi Service 

$61.50 All homes are assessed at approximately 65 percent of 
fair market value. 

1974 Real Estate $69,959,153 - Personal Property $1,405,395 
(Total $71,364,548) Number of Accounts, Approximately 4,600 
Full-time 18-man force - 28 call man force - equipment in- 
cludes one 100' Aerial Ladder truck 

Full-time 19 man - 24 man auxiliary force - 3 radio-equipped 
cruisers - 1 inspector 
To most of Town 
To part of Town 
Municipal Plant to whole Town 
To 75 percent of Town 

Supervised Playgrounds - Summer Swimming Instructions - 
Tennis Courts - Softball Diamonds - Baseball Diamonds - 
Public Beaches on Seashore - Ponds for Ice Skating (some 
are lighted) - 9 hole Golf Course - Boat Club - Yacht Club - 
Wildlife Sanctuary - Salt & Fresh Water Fishing - Movie 
Theatre - 16 Lane Bowling Alley - Pool & Billiards - Golden 
Age Club - Teen Drop-In Center 



78 



Zoning: 

Housing: 
Schools: 



Churches: 

Medical 
Facilities: 



Shopping: 



Public Library: 
Health: 

News: 
Industry: 



Protection by adequate zoning and planning regulations 
insures controlled growth of residential, commercial and 
industrial areas. 

3 Projects ( 144 units providing for low income families and 
Elderly Citizens) 

4 Elementary Schools (2 Auxiliary Buildings) - Junior High 
School - High School - Pupil-Teacher Ratio 13.52 - 1. Special 
Classes for Retarded or emotionally disturbed educable - 
Classes for Perceptually handicapped - Kindergartens - 
Regional Vo-Tech High School - Comprehensive program of 
evening classes for adults 

2 Baptist - 3 Catholic - 1 Christian Science - 1 Congregational - 
1 Episcopal - 1 Greek Orthodox - 1 Methodist 

12 Physicians - 6 Dentists - 45 Bed Hospital - Visiting Nurses - 

Convalescent Homes - Ambulance Service - 2 Pharmacies - 2 

Veterinarians 

Good Facilities in Center of Town - New Shopping center - 

Antique Shops - Apparel Stores - Auto Body & Supply Shops - 

banks - Beauty Shops (Barber Shops & Hair Stylists) - 

Building Supplies - Cleaners - Gift Shops - Grocery Stores 

(fruit and vegetable stands) - Hardware Stores - Jewelers - 

Laundromats - Pharmacies - Restaurants - Service Stations - 

Sport Shops - Variety Stores and many more. 

50,000 volume library - open 6 days a week - Micro filmed 

data - Audio-Visual Equipment. 

Dump open 7 days a week - rubbish Collection Weekly - 

Garbage Collection Weekly in winter, twice in summer - 

Ambulance Service 

Two Weekly Newspapers - Represented in three daily papers 

- Represented by 2 radio stations. 

Sylvania - Five Major Shellfish Plants - Monument 

Manufacturing - Several Woodworking establishments. 



79 



>6 

n 
7 S 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 2122 00162 127 9 



MARTIN PRINTING CORPORATION MELROSE, MASSACHUSETTS 



80 



IN MEMORIAM 




William Moseley 

Fire and Police 

February 01, 1974 



ST 1 



*& 




David Claxton 

Board of Assessors 

April 10, 1974 




John Bar an 

Electric Light 

October 05, 1974 






Harry Sagris 

School & Librarian 

March 20, 1974 



Peter Zervas 

School Committee 

May 02, 1974 



George J. Geanakos 
School Committee 
November 19, 1974 



No Picture Available 

Armour Chapman, Sr. 
Water-Forestry-Cemetery 
May 03, 1974 



No Picture Available 

Thomas Clancy 

Executive Secretary 

September 23, 1974 



Ipswich Public Library 

Ipswich, Massachusetts